Privacy Survey Says: Americans Don't Want to Sell Their Data

A new survey shows the extent to which Americans are reluctant to sell their personal information for any price.



A new study says that many of the assumptions corporations have been making about consumers and their privacy are seriously flawed. And in the new dawn of GDPR, those bad assumptions could have serious consequences.

The study, conducted by digital communications firm Syzygy, surveyed 3,000 adults in the US, UK, and Germany. Asked whether they would sell their private data to a company — even a favored brand — 55% of Americans say that they would not, no matter the price offered.

One of the major surprises in the data came from the question of whether consumers would trade private information for a smoother or more personal online experience. While it is an article of faith for many online companies and services that consumers are happy to make this trade, only 21% of  Americans are willing to do so.

For those who are willing to sell their data to companies, $150 is the median price they would accept. And when it comes to ongoing monitoring of online activity, 33% say they would be willing to let Google watch them Web-surf — in exchange for $25 a month.

For more, read here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Email This  | 
Print  | 
RSS
More Insights
Copyright © 2021 UBM Electronics, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service