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There'll Always Be An England -- It Just Won't Have Any Secure Laptops

The news that more than 650 of the British Ministry of Defence's laptop computers have been stolen over the past four years, along with dozens of thumb drives over the last few months, all containing sensitive information, offers a startling reminder of just how mobile your mobile devices can unfortunately be.
The news that more than 650 of the British Ministry of Defence's laptop computers have been stolen over the past four years, along with dozens of thumb drives over the last few months, all containing sensitive information, offers a startling reminder of just how mobile your mobile devices can unfortunately be.In admitting the loss of hundreds of laptops and memory sticks, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) was placed in the position of admitting as well that previous figures for stolen data devices had missed the mark by hundreds of devices.

So there's Lesson Number Two: when you're coming "clean" about a data breach (or potential breach)get the numbers right right away.

But it's Lesson Number One that has the most relevance for small and midsize businesses: information on the move can be moved out of your control in an instant.

According to a government review, MoD displayed little awareness of even basic security procedures, with its staff unaware of the dangers of losing information.

Incredible!

This is as good a time as any -- every Monday is, in fact -- to undertake a thorough review of your own:

How many mobile devices containing sensitive information does your company have in the field?

How many employees are using their own mobile devices for business?

How recently have all employees been drilled in the absolute basics of mobile data security?

Might not want to wait too long to do that review, at least if the British government's lessons are any indication.

MoD admitted over the weekend that yet another military laptop had been stolen, this one as an MoD official checked out of a hotel.

You gotta hope that whatever the purpose of the trip it didn't produce any new sensitive info on the machine that's now in the crooks' hands.

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Kirsten Powell, Senior Manager for Security & Risk Management at Adobe
Joshua Goldfarb, Director of Product Management at F5