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11/28/2014
09:00 AM
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas
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Why We Need Better Cyber Security: A Graphical Snapshot

By 2022, demand for security industry professionals will grow 37%.
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Over the past year, we have all experienced the onslaught of headlines about major hacks and widespread new information security threats. It has been dark reading, indeed, for the hundreds of millions of consumers who have seen their credit card numbers, email addresses, and other personal information exposed by online intruders.

Globally, cybercrime costs exceed $445 billion each year, with the United States accounting for nearly one-quarter of that price tag, the Center for Strategic and International Studies reported in June.

How did we get here, and what does it mean for the future? Researchers in the Florida Tech University online Master of Science in Information Technology/Cybersecurity program recently pulled together data on industry trends and predictions to create a graphical portrait of where the industry is -- and where it needs to be. Take a look at our slideshow on their findings, and then let's chat about what steps your company is taking in the fight for better cyber security.

 

Marilyn has been covering technology for business, government, and consumer audiences for over 20 years. Prior to joining UBM, Marilyn worked for nine years as editorial director at TechTarget Inc., where she launched six Websites for IT managers and administrators supporting ... View Full Bio

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Nemos
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Nemos,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/30/2014 | 10:29:53 AM
Cyber war
The second slide of your presentation "activated"(in terms of cyber war) the following question : how possible is to have a cyber war , what does that mean and how can affect the daily (real) life.  
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/30/2014 | 12:03:49 PM
Is this a trend?
Excellent Article

"The growing number of attacks on our cyber security networks remains a serious economic and national security issue."

As you clearly point out, there is a trend, and it something that bares the question who's holding the ball?

Either those that perform hacks are getting smarter (and the security companies are playing catch up)? Or the current set of security protocols has become obsolete?

One thing is different from, lets say, 5 years ago...people are more online than ever before, and cloud solutions have risen as a viable option for any and all businesses.

So perhaps this has led to many identifying exploits that can be easilly replicated across many platforms.

What those the community think?
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/1/2014 | 7:53:27 AM
Re: Is this a trend?
@mejiac, I think you are right on all points. Hackers are getting smarter, current, tried-and-true security technology is much less effective, and the Internet is more pervasive in our daily lives. It's a perfect storm! 
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2014 | 10:09:33 AM
Re: Is this a trend?
@Marilyn Cohodas,

So the question remains...do we get out of the storm? (mearning pursuit more low tech solutions), or get better rain coats?

I think an answer lies somewhere inbetween, in I think the finance industry would be the ones trying to implement more robust security meassures
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
12/1/2014 | 1:15:23 PM
Re: Is this a trend?
This is not a knock on security professionals but the discussion is beginning to sound more like the DEA's response to the War on Drugs. Throw more resources and people at it and then we will win! We've seen how well that worked out.

I watched the 60 Minutes segment on Cyber Security last night. Especially interesting was the guy from FireEye. It was first time I heard the story that FireEye's stuff caught the Target breach but the warning was lost in all the false positives from other security software. That doesn't sound like something that throwing MORE people at will fix, sounds like we need better systems.

The other key takeaway for me was his comment that you WILL get breached, that battle is just to limit how long it lasts and what they get access to. Again, not something throwing security people at is going to fix.

No question the awareness of security importance has to be drilled into developers and architects of systems. From a cost point of view, businesses will sure get more bang for their buck that way than paying people who do security and nothing else. But there is no magic bullet here.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/1/2014 | 3:27:01 PM
Re: Is this a trend?
I saw the 60 minutes segment, too and much of what was reported there (for a general audience) has been part of our regular conversation on Dark Reading. But to your point, the challenge is definitely getting right people, the  right technology and the right processes to get through all the noise. There is no magic bullet, to be sure, but we can do better. 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
12/1/2014 | 4:15:29 PM
Re: Is this a trend?
60 Minutes was very general and non technical, Marilyn. I suspected none of that was news to you professionals. I'm primarily a developer and generalist (I'm only local IT guy here) who's background is from IBM mainframe and midrange servers, so I don't read Dark Reading very often. As a browser app developer, I am interested in staying up on application exploits in that vector. But almost all my apps are consumed internally behind a firewall, I'm not exposed like these public facing sites. So I don't lose a lot of sleep over cross site scripting.

But I had read a few articles on the Target breach, knew about initial access coming from one of their vendors hacked. Also knew the breach went undiscovered for a long time. But had no idea some security systems flagged it and it just wasn't acted on because of the routine noise. Is that called a "Chicken Little" system? :-)

My main point is I'd be shocked to see any IT job grow by 37%. I mean, more software gets written and used every year and you sure don't see developer jobs growing to match that. The underlying tech/systems has to solve this, not throwing more people at it who can only do so much about careless password usage, phishing, infected web pages and opening rogue email attachments. We can't have a security professional following every business user around and authorizing every computer transaction. Just too much cost involved.
DavidC239
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DavidC239,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2014 | 11:35:59 AM
Re: Is this a trend?
/rant

If you don't have sufficient security staff to tune those monitoring systems in the first place (1) you will have an excessive amount of noise.  If your security staff are not 100% dedicated (left alone) to monitor those security systems (2) you will have more security incidents.  If you do not have sufficient security staff engaged in the SDLC and project development process (3) then you will end up allowing insecure systems and software to be implemented in your production environment, which will result in more security incidents.  If your security staff does not have sufficient (and *current*) training on the latest threats and how to counter them then they will miss or be delayed in responding to the resulting security incidents.   "That doesn't sound like something that throwing MORE people at will fix, sounds like we need better systems." (5) suggests a lack of understanding of what it really takes in todays hostile world...

1.  Tuning your monitoring systems = security staff

2.  Dedicated security monitoring = security staff

3.  Engaged with the IT and business units during product/software development = security staff

4.  Ensuring a robust training budget exists for security = well trained security staff

5.  Intelligent, accurate, efficient, and automated security technology does not really exist.  That stuff might exist in the CSI TV show but not in the real world.  The security technology that *does* exist still requires #1, #2, #4 above.

We can't do our jobs on a shoe string staffing budget, without advanced, continous training, and if we are pulled in 15 different directions, leaving the house unguarded (Target breach anyone?), then you get what you get... hacked!  We are facing warehouses and dorms full of foreign hackers with all the advantages.  Either we comit to fighting the good fight (in the hear and now) or we disconnect from the web, take our ball and go home.

/rant

PS.  I do not, nor have I ever worked for, or been affiliated with Target.  My views are my own and have no realtion to current or past employers.
Keith Graham
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Keith Graham,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2014 | 1:53:36 PM
Training and awareness for end users
I'd like to also just throw into the mix here, that a major part of the problem is lack of training and awareness of our end users.  I dont disagree with any of the points made here, but all the time we have non-savvy users falling for that phishing email, clicking that link/or opening that weaponized document (thus resulting in malware being downloaded and an attacker getting a foothold) we're onto a losing battle. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/2/2014 | 1:56:31 PM
Re: Training and awareness for end users
That's very true @Keith Graham, But we all know the limits of user training. And the phishers are so sophisticated these days, I bet they can fool even the most expert & skeptical security expert occaisionally. 
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