Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

News

2/20/2008
08:08 PM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
Commentary
Connect Directly
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Big Challenges Ahead

Late last week, the National Academy of Engineering issued a list of the biggest technical challenges of the 21st century, some real thorny knots like reverse-engineer the human brain and prevent nuclear terrorism. It got me wondering how the some of brightest minds in storage might answer the same question. So I asked them.

Late last week, the National Academy of Engineering issued a list of the biggest technical challenges of the 21st century, some real thorny knots like reverse-engineer the human brain and prevent nuclear terrorism.

It got me wondering how the some of brightest minds in storage might answer the same question. So I asked them.My query went out to a completely unscientific cross-section of enterprise customers, storage industry analysts, and a few vendors whose opinions can be trusted to rise above the din of their marketing departments. I'll share their responses with you later this week.

I don't expect their responses to be as altruistic as those from the thinkers of big thoughts assembled by the NAE at the request of the National Science Foundation.

Here's the NAE's list of our century's greatest technical challenges:

--Make solar energy economical --Provide energy from fusion --Develop carbon sequestration methods --Manage the nitrogen cycle --Engineer better medicines --Reverse-engineer the brain --Prevent nuclear terror --Secure cyberspace --Enhance virtual reality

Broadly speaking, these challenges fell into four broad categories that "are essential for humanity to flourish," according to this report: sustainability, health, reducing vulnerability, and joy of living.

Here are my best guesses as to the major headings under which the storage industry's responses will fall:

--Reduced complexity, from both physical infrastructure and network management perspectives.

--Richer interoperability, with standards or specs that go well beyond the simplistic SMI-S, which has had no discernible effect on pricing or the ability to build multivendor storage networks.

--Greater automation, whether it's formatting and/or ganging together newly needed LUNs, improving the time required for backups or disaster recoveries, or managing usage policies that don't require advanced degrees in programming.

So there might be some reduced vulnerability and joy of living in there after all. In any case, check back here Friday for a distillation of the challenges that need to be addressed for storage to flourish.

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/10/2020
Researcher Finds New Office Macro Attacks for MacOS
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  8/7/2020
Hacking It as a CISO: Advice for Security Leadership
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/10/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
This special report takes a look at how enterprises are using threat intelligence, as well as emerging best practices for integrating threat intel into security operations and incident response. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-15596
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-12
The ALPS ALPINE touchpad driver before 8.2206.1717.634, as used on various Dell, HP, and Lenovo laptops, allows attackers to conduct Path Disclosure attacks via a "fake" DLL file.
CVE-2020-15868
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-12
Sonatype Nexus Repository Manager OSS/Pro before 3.26.0 has Incorrect Access Control.
CVE-2020-17362
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-12
search.php in the Nova Lite theme before 1.3.9 for WordPress allows Reflected XSS.
CVE-2020-17449
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-12
PHP-Fusion 9.03 allows XSS via the error_log file.
CVE-2020-17450
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-12
PHP-Fusion 9.03 allows XSS on the preview page.