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Secure Computing Launches S.W.A.T.

Secure Computing unveils S.W.A.T. -- Secure Web 2.0 Anti-Threat intiative

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Secure Computing Corporation (Nasdaq: SCUR), the leading enterprise gateway security provider, today unveiled the company’s new “SWAT” Initiative for protecting organizations from Web 2.0-related threats carried in Web and messaging protocols. The “Secure Web 2.0 Anti-Threat” initiative is an intensive effort to provide corporations with informative research, tools, solutions and best practices vital for companies evaluating--or re-evaluating--their approach to Web and messaging security. At its core, the initiative is aimed at identifying and highlighting the essential components required to provide the best possible protection for businesses operating in a Web 2.0 environment and beyond. Research, resource and solution information related to SWAT can be found on the SWAT website at www.securecomputing.com/swat.

Secure Computing S.W.A.T. Initiative

Based on in-depth analysis of typical network policies and security architectures, a commissioned study from Forrester Consulting focused on determining how companies are responding to employee Web and messaging use, and global threat data from TrustedSource.org, Secure Computing has identified the core security components and architecture necessary to effectively combat Web 2.0 threats. The company’s objective is to leverage its security expertise and ongoing research to help businesses implement a proactive security architecture that can protect their environments as existing Web and messaging threats increase and new threats arise.

“Today’s Web environment provides a vastly improved user experience and access to information due to the rapid adoption of Web 2.0 technologies like AJAX, XML and RDF,” said Atri Chatterjee, senior vice president at Secure Computing. “However, as in other technological innovations before it, Web 2.0 technologies have also lead to new vulnerabilities and new techniques for compromising corporate networks and data. Unfortunately, our research bears out that company’s simply aren’t doing enough today. Most organizations are not adequately protected; their users are insufficiently trained on using these technologies, and they are spending large sums of money recovering from attacks. Our initiative aims to provide information and resources that help organizations understand the evolving threats environment and take steps to proactively protect themselves.”

Secure Computing Corp. (Nasdaq: SCUR)

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