Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

8/7/2015
09:15 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

Risk of Data Loss From Non-Jailbroken iOS Devices Real, Security Firm says

Data from the Hacking Team reveals actively used exploit for breaking into and stealing data from registered iOS systems, FireEye says.

Mobile devices based on Apple’s iOS are generally considered safer against malicious hacking threats than Android-based systems. But they are not immune from data stealing attacks altogether.

Data leaked by the intruders who broke into the Hacking Team’s network last month suggest the Italian security firm has exploits for infiltrating into, and stealing data from, jailbroken as well as non jailbroken iOS devices.

That same leaked information could also give other hackers potent new clues and ready-to-use techniques for carrying out similar attacks against iOS users, security firm FireEye said in a report released this week.

FireEye examined over 400GB of Hacking Team data leaked by the attackers and discovered that the company has sophisticated, remotely-controllable exploits for all major mobile platforms including iOS, Android, Windows Phone, BlackBerry and Symbian.

Among the most significant of the exploits is an iOS Remote Control System (RCS) agent that can be used to access information from a compromised system and exfiltrate it to an attacker-controlled system.

The Hacking Team tool is disguised as an innocuous newsstand app and comes with a transparent icon that conceals its presence on an iOS device, FireEye noted in its report. Once the app is installed and trusted by a user, it can be used to steal contact and calendar information, photos, video and other data on the compromised device. The app also features a keyboard extension capable of recording the keystrokes made by a user and sending it to a remote server.

The Hacking Team app is a weaponized version of an iOS exploit dubbed the ‘Masque Attack’ that FireEye had first blogged about last year. The attack method takes advantage of a now-patched flaw in multiple versions of iOS that allowed attackers to replace a legitimate application installed on a iOS device with a malicious application so long as both the apps had the same binary identifier or file name. The vulnerability resulted from Apple’s failure to ensure that two applications with the same identifier had matching digital certificates, FireEye had noted in its report. This allowed attackers to create malicious applications with binary identifiers belonging to legitimate apps, sign it with an enterprise or developer certificate, and distribute it to unsuspecting users.

In its analysis of the leaked data from the Hacking Team, FireEye discovered 11 Masque Attack type iOS apps that were disguised to appear like re-packaged versions of applications like Facebook, Whatsapp, Twitter, Viber, and Skype. “Because all the bundle identifiers are the same as the genuine apps on App Store, they can directly replace the genuine apps on iOS devices prior 8.1.3,” FireEye said.

The data reviewed by FireEye suggests that the Masque Attack type apps developed by the Hacking Team have been deployed in the field for months, the report added.

“The risks of data losses via iOS devices are real,” said Raymond Wei, senior director, mobile development at FireEye. “The risks are increasing due to the leak of Hacking Team data, which has provided cues and even ready-to-use tools for less technically capable attackers,” he said in an email.

The trend highlights the need for enterprises to control access to corporate data when malware is detected on an employee’s mobile device, Wei said. It also shows why administrators need to restrict installation of iOS applications on corporate owned devices unless the applications are obtained from the official App Store, he said. Users with personally owned devices should be urged to avoid installation of third-party applications on devices that are used to access and store corporate data, he added.

Jai Vijayan is a seasoned technology reporter with over 20 years of experience in IT trade journalism. He was most recently a Senior Editor at Computerworld, where he covered information security and data privacy issues for the publication. Over the course of his 20-year ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Why Cyber-Risk Is a C-Suite Issue
Marc Wilczek, Digital Strategist & CIO Advisor,  11/12/2019
6 Small-Business Password Managers
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  11/8/2019
Unreasonable Security Best Practices vs. Good Risk Management
Jack Freund, Director, Risk Science at RiskLens,  11/13/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-18885
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
fs/btrfs/volumes.c in the Linux kernel before 5.1 allows a btrfs_verify_dev_extents NULL pointer dereference via a crafted btrfs image because fs_devices->devices is mishandled within find_device, aka CID-09ba3bc9dd15.
CVE-2019-18895
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Scanguard through 2019-11-12 on Windows has Insecure Permissions for the installation directory, leading to privilege escalation via a Trojan horse executable file.
CVE-2019-18957
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
Microstrategy Library in MicroStrategy before 2019 before 11.1.3 has reflected XSS.
CVE-2019-16863
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
STMicroelectronics ST33TPHF2ESPI TPM devices before 2019-09-12 allow attackers to extract the ECDSA private key via a side-channel timing attack because ECDSA scalar multiplication is mishandled, aka TPM-FAIL.
CVE-2019-18949
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-14
SnowHaze before 2.6.6 is sometimes too late to honor a per-site JavaScript blocking setting, which leads to unintended JavaScript execution via a chain of webpage redirections targeted to the user's browser configuration.