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Vulnerabilities / Threats

6/7/2018
10:00 AM

7 Variants (So Far) of Mirai

Mirai is an example of the newest trend in rapidly evolving, constantly improving malware. These seven variants show how threat actors are making bad malware worse.
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IoTroop
Like many family trees, Mirai has branches that shoot directly from the original root and others that are a bit farther out in the canopy. IoTroop is one of the latter, but it's curving back to rejoin the main stem, making it more interesting than your average third cousin, twice removed.
IoTroop has Mirai code as its foundation, but it is a variant that has taken a huge leap from its roots. It begins with the way that IoTroop infects a device. Whereas Mirai uses brute force user ID and password guessing, IoTroop searches for vulnerabilities to exploit. 
Then come the big changes: IoTroop doesn't place a Mirai-style DDoS engine on a device. Instead, it places a loader that constantly communicates with a C&C server. The server can then pass any one of a number of payloads to the victim device, turning the network into whatever illicit form someone is willing to pay for.
(Image: Profit_Image VIA SHUTTERSTOCK)

IoTroop

Like many family trees, Mirai has branches that shoot directly from the original root and others that are a bit farther out in the canopy. IoTroop is one of the latter, but it's curving back to rejoin the main stem, making it more interesting than your average third cousin, twice removed.

IoTroop has Mirai code as its foundation, but it is a variant that has taken a huge leap from its roots. It begins with the way that IoTroop infects a device. Whereas Mirai uses brute force user ID and password guessing, IoTroop searches for vulnerabilities to exploit.

Then come the big changes: IoTroop doesn't place a Mirai-style DDoS engine on a device. Instead, it places a loader that constantly communicates with a C&C server. The server can then pass any one of a number of payloads to the victim device, turning the network into whatever illicit form someone is willing to pay for.

(Image: Profit_Image VIA SHUTTERSTOCK)

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MarkSindone
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MarkSindone,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/22/2018 | 1:30:53 AM
Under control
Malware, like technology, is constantly improving. There really isn't any particular one way that can totally diminish this entire threat for good. However, it is still in our best interests that we take note of them so as to know what to expect and how to handle and take them down for good using the correct methods. If we find out about them without knowing the counter measures to be put in place, then we might suffer even tougher consequences that might just be irreversible.
PaulChau
50%
50%
PaulChau,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2018 | 2:59:56 AM
Beat the robots
It's scary to think that there are more than people trying to introduce hazards and dangers into our systems you know. These bots are so easily configured to attack from a different angle just by switching up a line or two of code! Security teams are really going to have to work hard to stay ahead of the game now!
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