Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT/Embedded Security

// // //
10/30/2018
09:35 AM
Black Hat Staff
Black Hat Staff
News Analysis-Security Now

Satori Botnet Resurfaces & Targets Android Devices

Despite that fact its author has been sent back to jail, the Satori botnet has recently resurfaced and seems to be targeting Android devices, according to a research note from CenturyLink.

The Satori botnet, which has been associated with numerous attacks over the past two years, is proving resilient despite the fact that its main author has been returned to jail in recent days.

After falling virtually silent in late August and early September, when its creator was indicted on federal charges for violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, Satori has resurfaced, according to research from CenturyLink, which posted an October 29 update on the botnet.

CenturyLink research recorded evidence that the botnet's command-and-control (C&C) server being reactivated over the last few weeks with increased Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) bot traffic being directed to that IP address.

(Source: iStock)
(Source: iStock)

"After identifying hosts which were scanning the Internet on port TCP/5555, we could confirm that they were indeed largely from the same infected device pool that existed before the shutdown," according to Monday's blog post.

On September 25, the CenturyLink Threat Research Labs recorded about 9,900 unique IP address attempting to connect to the main control port -- TCP/7000 -- that is associated with the C&C server. Researchers noted that about 57% of all the traffic originated in Tunisia, while another 37% came from the US.

The researchers also noted that a significant volume of this traffic came from Android-based devices, and CenturyLink is notifying network providers about this malicious traffic. Previously, the botnet targeted Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

In an email, Mike Benjamin, the head of CenturyLink Threat Research Labs, noted that Satori, as well as its predecessor -- the Mirai botnet -- have shown the ability to adopt new methods and new attacks over time. For instance, researchers noted several months ago that Satori was being used as part of a crypto mining scheme. (See Satori Botnet Plays Hidden Role in Cryptomining Scheme, Researchers Find.)

"In multiple instances, it was the first Mirai variant to adopt an attack method, and in one case it actually utilized a zero-day exploit," Benjamin told Security Now. "The targeting of the Android debugger service follows this trend, and has recently been employed by a number of malware families, all fighting over control of the same vulnerable footprint. The CenturyLink Threat Labs' research shows how the Satori installer took the time to remove a cryptominer malware upon execution."

Benjamin added that while Satori still retains the ability to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, it has not conducted one of these so far.

Tracking Satori botnet traffic\r\n(Source: CenturyLink)\r\n
Tracking Satori botnet traffic
\r\n(Source: CenturyLink)\r\n

"It has maintained an ability to launch DDoS attacks throughout its existence, including today," Benjamin added. "The actor's ability to introduce new exploits quickly has on multiple occasions given it a potential attack power, which resulted in immediate action by CenturyLink to block its ability to operate across our global IP network and work quickly with the wider security community to neutralize its ability to attack globally."

Previously, Radware researchers found that Satori had been targeting D-Link routers in an effort to expand its own network. This happened a few months before the creator of the botnet, Kenneth Currin Schuchman, was charged by federal prosecutors. (See Satori Botnet Targeting D-Link Routers in Latest Attack.)

Following his initial arrest in August, Schuchman, who also goes by the name Nexus Zeta and who first used the source code for the Mirai botnet to create the Satori network, was released.

However, according to ZDNet, Schuchman was re-arrested on October 12 for violating the terms of his pre-trial release. It's not clear what conditions he violated.

In his email, Benjamin did not speculate on who might be running Satori with Schuchman in and out of jail over the last several months, but he noted that a botnet of this size is usually too large for one person to oversee by themselves.

"In establishing botnets of this nature, it is not uncommon for actors to work with others to ensure they can grow their footprint quickly and keep it operating at scale," Benjamin wrote. "It is reasonable to assume that the author was working with others on this particular botnet instance."

Related posts:

— Scott Ferguson is the managing editor of Light Reading and the editor of Security Now. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Black Hat USA 2022 Attendee Report
Black Hat attendees are not sleeping well. Between concerns about attacks against cloud services, ransomware, and the growing risks to the global supply chain, these security pros have a lot to be worried about. Read our 2022 report to hear what they're concerned about now.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2022-2817
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-15
Use After Free in GitHub repository vim/vim prior to 9.0.0212.
CVE-2022-38357
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-15
Improper neutralization of special elements leaves the Eyes of Network Web application vulnerable to an iFrame injection attack, via the url parameter of /module/module_frame/index.php.
CVE-2022-38358
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-15
Improper neutralization of input during web page generation leaves the Eyes of Network web application vulnerable to cross-site scripting attacks at /module/admin_notifiers/rules.php and /module/report_event/indext.php via the parameters rule_notification, rule_name, and rule_name_old, and at /modul...
CVE-2022-38359
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-15
Cross-site request forgery attacks can be carried out against the Eyes of Network web application, due to an absence of adequate protections. An attacker can, for instance, delete the admin user by directing an authenticated user to the URL https://<target-address>/module/admin_user/index.php?...
CVE-2022-28756
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-15
The Zoom Client for Meetings for macOS (Standard and for IT Admin) starting with version 5.7.3 and before 5.11.5 contains a vulnerability in the auto update process. A local low-privileged user could exploit this vulnerability to escalate their privileges to root.