Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint Security //

Windows

End of Bibblio RCM includes -->
1/12/2018
09:05 AM
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb

Security Warning: Intel Inside

At CES, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich looked to reassure the whole industry that the chip maker would ensure that its processors were secure following the Meltdown and Spectre disclosures.

Intel continued its post-Meltdown, post-Spectre spin tour at CES this week, issuing statements about its commitment to "Security First."

CEO Brian Krzanich issued a pledge on the subject to the tech community at large on January 11.

First, Krzanich said there would be a "Customer-First Urgency." This phrase translated into saying that by Monday, January 15, the company will have issued "updates" for at least 90% of the Intel Corp. (Nasdaq: INTC) CPUs that have been introduced in the past five years. Updates for the remainder would show up by the end of January. (See Meltdown & Spectre News Gets Worse – & Better.)

Krzanich then went on to say Intel would have "Transparent and Timely Communications." Since all the updating and patching would have performance hits associated with them, this meant that company would commit to provide frequent progress reports of patch progress, performance data and "other information."

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich\r\n(Source: Intel)\r\n
Intel CEO Brian Krzanich
\r\n(Source: Intel)\r\n

This kind of information would be available through the Intel website.

The information released on January 10 was for 6th, 7th and 8th Generation CPUs running Windows 10. Performance was reduced generally between 6% and 8%, with complex JavaScript operations on the web dropping by about 10%. Workloads that were graphics-intensive (gaming) or compute-intensive (financial analysis) saw a minimal impact.

In addition, 8th Generation CPUs hooked up to solid state drives (SSDs) were reported to show minimal impact from the patches.

The final point of Intel's plan is called "Ongoing Security Assurance," which means the company is committing to publicly identify significant security vulnerabilities following what it calls the rules of "responsible disclosure."

Not only that, Intel says it's working with "the industry" to share hardware innovations that will accelerate "industry-level progress in dealing with side-channel attacks" -- the kind that lead to the situation that the chip maker finds itself in right now. What those innovations might be, or how they might be shared is left vague, however.

The effort by Intel to assure everyone that everything will be just fine and the hit from the patches won't be so bad is understandable. The company has some major digging to do in order to get out of the hole that it currently finds itself in. (See New Intel Vulnerability Hits Almost Everyone.)

Still, alluding to some unnamed hardware innovations that Intel says it will share at some future date isn't going to cut it. Specifics are going to be required, and in short order. People are definitely paying attention to the company behind the curtain, and no amount of smoke and mirrors will be able substitute for facts.

Related posts:

— Larry Loeb has written for many of the last century's major "dead tree" computer magazines, having been, among other things, a consulting editor for BYTE magazine and senior editor for the launch of WebWeek.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Practical Network Security Approaches for a Multicloud, Hybrid IT World
The report covers areas enterprises should focus on for their multicloud/hybrid cloud security strategy: -increase visibility over the environment -learning cloud-specific skills -relying on established security frameworks -re-architecting the network
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2022-30333
PUBLISHED: 2022-05-09
RARLAB UnRAR before 6.12 on Linux and UNIX allows directory traversal to write to files during an extract (aka unpack) operation, as demonstrated by creating a ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file. NOTE: WinRAR and Android RAR are unaffected.
CVE-2022-23066
PUBLISHED: 2022-05-09
In Solana rBPF versions 0.2.26 and 0.2.27 are affected by Incorrect Calculation which is caused by improper implementation of sdiv instruction. This can lead to the wrong execution path, resulting in huge loss in specific cases. For example, the result of a sdiv instruction may decide whether to tra...
CVE-2022-28463
PUBLISHED: 2022-05-08
ImageMagick 7.1.0-27 is vulnerable to Buffer Overflow.
CVE-2022-28470
PUBLISHED: 2022-05-08
marcador package in PyPI 0.1 through 0.13 included a code-execution backdoor.
CVE-2022-1620
PUBLISHED: 2022-05-08
NULL Pointer Dereference in function vim_regexec_string at regexp.c:2729 in GitHub repository vim/vim prior to 8.2.4901. NULL Pointer Dereference in function vim_regexec_string at regexp.c:2729 allows attackers to cause a denial of service (application crash) via a crafted input.