Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

2/12/2010
06:17 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Social Engineering Scammers Offer Live Support

A new rogue antivirus scheme has enlisted live "support" personnel to deceive victims.

Just like legitimate software companies, cyber scammers are experimenting with online services supported by human intelligence.

Symantec reports that those behind the fake antivirus software known as Live PC Care have added a new social engineering element -- live support agents who will try to convince potential victims that their PCs are infected and that payment is the cure.

The Live PC Care "virus scan" screen now includes a yellow online support button that affords those reluctant to part with their money the opportunity to banter with fraud support.

"If a potential victim clicks on the online support button they are brought to a live support chat session," said Symantec security researcher Peter Coogan in a blog post. "The authors of Live PC Care have taken advantage of a legitimate freeware live chat system called LiveZilla. This system allows Live PC Care victims to chat online with so-called 'support agents.'"

Based on the interactions between Symantec researchers and the live support people, Coogan says that there really are people answering questions, and not automated scripts. Their goal, he says, is to allay suspicions and encourage the belief that the fake malware detected needs to be repaired.

Coogan says that the involvement of live support people shows just how big the business of fake antivirus scams has become.

Symantec says that between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2009, 250 different fake antivirus programs made 43 million installation attempts.

The company says that the cost of being victimized can go beyond the $30 to $100 price for useless software to include additional fraud arising from credit card theft.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Sodinokibi Ransomware: Where Attackers' Money Goes
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  10/15/2019
How to Think Like a Hacker
Dr. Giovanni Vigna, Chief Technology Officer at Lastline,  10/10/2019
7 SMB Security Tips That Will Keep Your Company Safe
Steve Zurier, Contributing Writer,  10/11/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: The old using of sock puppets for Shoulder Surfing technique. 
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
2019 Online Malware and Threats
2019 Online Malware and Threats
As cyberattacks become more frequent and more sophisticated, enterprise security teams are under unprecedented pressure to respond. Is your organization ready?
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-17672
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-17
WordPress before 5.2.4 is vulnerable to a stored XSS attack to inject JavaScript into STYLE elements.
CVE-2019-17673
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-17
WordPress before 5.2.4 is vulnerable to poisoning of the cache of JSON GET requests because certain requests lack a Vary: Origin header.
CVE-2019-17674
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-17
WordPress before 5.2.4 is vulnerable to stored XSS (cross-site scripting) via the Customizer.
CVE-2019-17675
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-17
WordPress before 5.2.4 does not properly consider type confusion during validation of the referer in the admin pages, possibly leading to CSRF.
CVE-2019-17676
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-17
app/system/admin/admin/index.class.php in MetInfo 7.0.0beta allows a CSRF attack to add a user account via a doSaveSetup action to admin/index.php, as demonstrated by an admin/?n=admin&c=index&a=doSaveSetup URI.