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Vulnerability Management

1/4/2019
03:35 PM

How Intel Has Responded to Spectre and Meltdown

In a newly published editorial and video, Intel details what specific actions it has taken in the wake of the discovery of the CPU vulnerabilities.
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The Intel Product Assurance and Security (IPAS) Group
One of Intel's first public statements after the disclosure was its statement of a Security First Pledge. One of the ways in which it brought that pledge into the real world was through the creation of the Intel Product Assurance and Security Group.
In the statement announcing the creation of the group, its general manager, Leslie Culbertson, wrote, 'IPAS is designed to serve as a center of security excellence -- a sort of mission control -- that looks across all of Intel. Beyond addressing the security issues of today, we are looking longer-term at the evolving threat landscape and continuously improving product security in the years ahead.'
In its response to the speculative execution vulnerabilities, Intel has also increased its emphasis on security across all its product lines. It has created groups like STORM - the strategic offensive research and mitigation group, to conduct research on security across its chips and systems. In conducting its own offensive research, Intel is trying to move beyond points like those raised by Richard Ford, chief scientist at Forcepoint, who said that Intel (and other vendors) had found themselves creating ad hoc, point mitigations rather than long-term fixes. They were, he said, '...waiting until a researcher comes up with a new vulnerability of this type and responding to it, rather than trying to put an end to the entire line of vulnerabilities.'
(Image: Bru-n0 VIA Pixabay)

The Intel Product Assurance and Security (IPAS) Group

One of Intel's first public statements after the disclosure was its statement of a Security First Pledge. One of the ways in which it brought that pledge into the real world was through the creation of the Intel Product Assurance and Security Group.

In the statement announcing the creation of the group, its general manager, Leslie Culbertson, wrote, "IPAS is designed to serve as a center of security excellence - a sort of mission control - that looks across all of Intel. Beyond addressing the security issues of today, we are looking longer-term at the evolving threat landscape and continuously improving product security in the years ahead."

In its response to the speculative execution vulnerabilities, Intel has also increased its emphasis on security across all its product lines. It has created groups like STORM the strategic offensive research and mitigation group, to conduct research on security across its chips and systems. In conducting its own offensive research, Intel is trying to move beyond points like those raised by Richard Ford, chief scientist at Forcepoint, who said that Intel (and other vendors) had found themselves creating ad hoc, point mitigations rather than long-term fixes. They were, he said, "waiting until a researcher comes up with a new vulnerability of this type and responding to it, rather than trying to put an end to the entire line of vulnerabilities."

(Image: Bru-n0 VIA Pixabay)

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