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Vulnerabilities / Threats

12/1/2017
10:00 AM
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Security Geek Gift Guide

Fun gifts for cybersecurity co-workers and bosses alike.
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Deck the halls and get to shopping! It's that time of year again, but this time there's no need to scratch your head and desperately wonder what to get the security geeks in your life. We've got you covered with this gift guide, which offers up different ideas based on what kind of security pro you're shopping for. 

So kick back and check out these gift ideas. 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio
 

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/18/2017 | 7:14:20 PM
Password Notebook
FWIW, while the password notebook -- clearly labeled and marketed as such -- is utterly ridiculous, many cybersecurity experts have long been reversing the traditional wisdom and advising that people do write their passwords down...just so long as they don't store the written password in an open or obvious place (such as in a top desk drawer, stuck to a computer monitor or keyboard, or in a clearly marked "password notebook").

Of course, the whole purpose of writing down passwords as an enhanced security tactic is that it allows you to have better and more entropic passwords. If you're still going to have passwords like "jordan23" (let alone "password1" or "123456"), you're not doing yourself much good.
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