Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

8/8/2015
02:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Q&A: 20 Minutes With The Dark Tangent

DEF CON founder Jeff Moss on this year's DEF CON 23 hacker conference and the Internet of Things.

DEF CON 23 -- Las Vegas -- Jeff Moss, aka The Dark Tangent, sat down with Dark Reading here yesterday for a quick chat about DEF CON 23 and IoT:

Q: What’s different about DEF CON this year?

Moss: It's just more of everything. Nothing is slowing down [hacking-wise] -- there's just more. We tried to capture more of the content, doing recordings in the Villages. What we're doing is knowledge transfer … of privacy, lock pick [and other Villages] recordings online. It might foster more interest for people to come online and watch.

There's also a certain amount of chaos: welcome to DEF CON.

Q: The Internet of Things now has its own village here at DEF CON, like Lockpick Village and Hardware Hacking Village. What are the challenges with getting security flaws fixed in these products?

Moss: When hackers started picking locks, the lock manufacturers got very upset, saying this is the way we've done it forever, and saw us as interlopers in their space, [saying] 'trust us' [to protect consumers]. But hackers would have none of that and [then] there was the first upgrade to physical locks in decades. We made them get better. In the beginning there were threats of lawsuits and other scariness, but now we know it was a new world.

Then medical devices, now with cars: it's following the same trajectory: 'don't tell anybody' … I'm betting this [car hacking research] will force the whole [car] industry to mature a bit. And it's not going to stop: after cars, it will be something else.

If we don’t get the software updating thing right, there will be trouble.

Q: What can or should the federal government's role be in ensuring IoT products are secured?

Moss: There's not much it can do about it. The government is structurally blocked, bureaucratically, etc. It's inflexible and not adaptable.

Now we're down to regulation, which nobody likes. If your [connected] toaster burns down your house, who are you going to sue? 

Jeff Moss, aka "The Dark Tangent"
Source: DEF CON
Source: DEF CON

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
US Turning Up the Heat on North Korea's Cyber Threat Operations
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  9/16/2019
Preventing PTSD and Burnout for Cybersecurity Professionals
Craig Hinkley, CEO, WhiteHat Security,  9/16/2019
NetCAT Vulnerability Is Out of the Bag
Dark Reading Staff 9/12/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-3738
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA BSAFE Crypto-J versions prior to 6.2.5 are vulnerable to an Improper Verification of Cryptographic Signature vulnerability. A malicious remote attacker could potentially exploit this vulnerability to coerce two parties into computing the same predictable shared key.
CVE-2019-3739
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA BSAFE Crypto-J versions prior to 6.2.5 are vulnerable to Information Exposure Through Timing Discrepancy vulnerabilities during ECDSA key generation. A malicious remote attacker could potentially exploit those vulnerabilities to recover ECDSA keys.
CVE-2019-3740
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA BSAFE Crypto-J versions prior to 6.2.5 are vulnerable to an Information Exposure Through Timing Discrepancy vulnerabilities during DSA key generation. A malicious remote attacker could potentially exploit those vulnerabilities to recover DSA keys.
CVE-2019-3756
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA Archer, versions prior to 6.6 P3 (6.6.0.3), contain an information disclosure vulnerability. Information relating to the backend database gets disclosed to low-privileged RSA Archer users' UI under certain error conditions.
CVE-2019-3758
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA Archer, versions prior to 6.6 P2 (6.6.0.2), contain an improper authentication vulnerability. The vulnerability allows sysadmins to create user accounts with insufficient credentials. Unauthenticated attackers could gain unauthorized access to the system using those accounts.