Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Vulnerabilities / Threats

1/16/2019
09:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

Malware Built to Hack Building Automation Systems

Researchers dig into vulnerabilities in popular building automation systems, devices.

S4x19 -- Miami -- Researchers who discovered multiple vulnerabilities in building automation system (BAS) equipment have also constructed proof-of-concept malware to exploit some of those security weaknesses.

Security researcher Elisa Costante and her team at ForeScout last summer created the test malware – a modular design that includes a worm that spreads itself among BAS devices – using intelligence they gathered over the past three years while testing popular BAS systems, such as protocol gateways and PLCs for HVACS and access control, for vulnerabilities. During that period, they uncovered 10 security flaws, half of which were cross-site scripting (XSS) bugs in their associated Web application interfaces, as well as privilege escalation and buffer overflow vulnerabilities.

Costante shared the team's research here at S4x19 this week.

While the affected BAS vendors - which ForeScout declined to reveal - have since patched the vulnerabilities, more than 11,000 of the affected devices today remain exposed on the public Internet to the buffer overflow flaw, mostly in schools and hospitals, due to poor patching processes or none at all, Costante says. Some had already fixed the flaws quietly in new versions of the devices.

"You still have a lot of [BAS] devices running on old firmware," Costante said in an interview with Dark Reading. BAS devices and equipment don't get updated or replaced regularly: Some 60% of BAS products in place today are around 20 years old, she said.

Building systems are the oft-forgotten and increasingly network-connected piece of the security puzzle. They fall into a category of their own and rarely are updated or vetted for security. BAS control systems manage and run physical operations of a building, such as HVAC, elevators, physical access control, and video surveillance.

"A lot of times, building automation systems sit on the enterprise, but IT has no access to them," said Dale Peterson, CEO of Digital Bond and the head of the S4 ICS SCADA conference. "They're not behind the firewall or [part of] ICS ... and they're not run by IT. It's a little group doing their own thing."

BAS SCADA systems often are older and not typically considered part of the overall IT infrastructure, noted Eddie Habibi, CEO of ICS security vendor PAS. "Protecting them could be a lot easier" than an OT network, he said, but most BAS managers don't even consider the cybersecurity of those systems. "It's OK to do a 10-minute shutdown [for patching a BAS]," he said. "You're not running a refinery."

Building Hacks
BAS hacking already is starting to become a thing: In a report published today on its BA system security findings and malware, ForeScout cited a 2016 ransomware attack on a hotel in Austria that targeted room locks and a distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that hit heating systems in two apartment buildings in Finland. And among some of the juicier BAS targets are data centers, for example, where temperature fluctuations via a hacked HVAC could wreak havoc and ruin computers, ForeScout said.

Costante said her team's goal was to create complex malware that couldn't be traced by forensics. They decided to first target in the malware an Internet-facing IP camera, which then spread to a workstation that ultimately got them to their target: the PLC that controls the building automation process. "From the Windows workstation, we use the core part of the malware, the exploitation of the buffer overflow [vulnerability]," she said.

The malware could be used to open a restricted phyisical access area to an attacker, such as a restricted area in an airport, she said.

ForeScout spent a total of $12,000 on the malware and equipment for the project, which Costante said demonstrates that BAS hacking doesn't require heavily resourced nation-state backing, for example. And part of the goal of the research was to test the vulnerability of BAS and possible attack scenarios.

"There was a lack of awareness on what you can do with buildings and how easy and exposed they are," Costante said.

Meanwhile, some building management operations are starting to find cybersecurity religion. David Weinstein, vice president of threat research at Claroty, said his company is seeing major real estate firms inquiring about securing their properties' building automation systems. "More CISOs are taking responsibility for OT and IoT," he said, and that also brings BAS into the security equation.

Related Content:

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/17/2019 | 7:09:51 AM
Systems off the domain
A forgotton computer sys relaed to this subject are the UPS shipping systems, often maintained by UPS and off the domain.  As such, IT does not update or rarely touch so these are particularly vulnerable.  Ransomware has been known to enter through these mostly abandoned portals.  But firms often don't know WHO is responsible for the thing and just let it exist.  Staff can access and presume them safe and secure when they are not.  Give malware the ability to sniff around and see what it can find and you have a hadean scenario. 
DevSecOps: The Answer to the Cloud Security Skills Gap
Lamont Orange, Chief Information Security Officer at Netskope,  11/15/2019
Attackers' Costs Increasing as Businesses Focus on Security
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/15/2019
Human Nature vs. AI: A False Dichotomy?
John McClurg, Sr. VP & CISO, BlackBerry,  11/18/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: -when I told you that our cyber-defense was from another age
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-15073
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
An Open Redirect vulnerability for all browsers in MAIL2000 through version 6.0 and 7.0, which will redirect to a malicious site without authentication. This vulnerability affects many mail system of governments, organizations, companies and universities.
CVE-2019-15072
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
The login feature in "/cgi-bin/portal" in MAIL2000 through version 6.0 and 7.0 has a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability, allowing execution of arbitrary code via any parameter. This vulnerability affects many mail system of governments, organizations, companies and universities.
CVE-2019-15071
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
The "/cgi-bin/go" page in MAIL2000 through version 6.0 and 7.0 has a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability, allowing execution of arbitrary code via ACTION parameter without authentication. The code can executed for any user accessing the page. This vulnerability affects many mail syste...
CVE-2019-6176
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
A potential vulnerability reported in ThinkPad USB-C Dock Firmware version 3.7.2 may allow a denial of service.
CVE-2019-6184
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
A potential vulnerability in the discontinued Customer Engagement Service (CCSDK) software version 2.0.21.1 may allow local privilege escalation.