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Vulnerabilities / Threats //

Insider Threats

7/19/2018
12:20 PM
Jai Vijayan
Jai Vijayan
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6 Ways to Tell an Insider Has Gone Rogue

Malicious activity by trusted users can be very hard to catch, so look for these red flags.
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3. Emailing or Downloading Data to Personal Accounts
A big red flag that a user is going or has gone rogue is when she starts emailing or downloading data to her personal email accounts. There is a chance that all the user wants to do is work on the data at home - which is risky, to say the least. Often, though, such activity is an indication that something is not right. In many instances of data and IP theft, rogue insiders have simply emailed sensitive data to their own accounts or downloaded it to personal thumb drives and other portable storage devices.
'Most likely this is against company policy to begin with,' says Kathie Miley, COO of Cybrary. 'But in addition to that, there should be no need for them to be downloading or emailing sensitive data to an account that is not authorized to receive that information.'
Look for unusual rates of copying or of files moving between servers or from the corporate network to external systems via cloud services, USB, or personal webmail, Wyatt adds.
Image Source: mansong suttakarn via Shutterstock

3. Emailing or Downloading Data to Personal Accounts

A big red flag that a user is going or has gone rogue is when she starts emailing or downloading data to her personal email accounts. There is a chance that all the user wants to do is work on the data at home which is risky, to say the least. Often, though, such activity is an indication that something is not right. In many instances of data and IP theft, rogue insiders have simply emailed sensitive data to their own accounts or downloaded it to personal thumb drives and other portable storage devices.

"Most likely this is against company policy to begin with," says Kathie Miley, COO of Cybrary. "But in addition to that, there should be no need for them to be downloading or emailing sensitive data to an account that is not authorized to receive that information."

Look for unusual rates of copying or of files moving between servers or from the corporate network to external systems via cloud services, USB, or personal webmail, Wyatt adds.

Image Source: mansong suttakarn via Shutterstock

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Larry Larsen
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Larry Larsen,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2018 | 1:49:45 PM
Great Reminders
Jai, these are all great reminders on monitoring priviledged users and other trusted insiders.  The biggest issue I've seen on this topic in my career is the lack of willingness to consider such a user as a potential threat.  Users with nefarious intent may count on that to enable their activities.
Mark Coates
50%
50%
Mark Coates,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2018 | 1:04:34 PM
Understanding the Rogue Threat is Key to Security
Excellent education piece on malicious insiders' motivations and behavior patterns. As a member of Christy Wyatt's team at Dtex, we are helping organizations detect behaviors daily that reveal when an insider threat is active. Any business with concerns can use this piece as a guidepost.
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