Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Threat Intelligence

6/12/2017
12:34 PM
50%
50%

FTC Issues Advice on Mobile Phone Data Security, Identity Theft

The Federal Trade Commission offers hindsight and foresight on ways to reduce identity theft should your mobile device get stolen.

Smartphones are small and easy to lose or have stolen, but the Federal Trade Commission doesn't believe that the data within the device has to suffer the same fate and is offering up steps to minimize identity theft.

The FTC, for starters, is pointing victims to IdentityTheft.gov, where reports can be filed to law enforcement agencies and a personalized recovery plan is drafted. But in addition to the site, the FTC is offering some before and after tips to smartphone users and BYOD workers.

Before a mobile device is lost or stolen, two-factor authentication should be turned on, as well as iOS' "Find My Phone" or Android's "Find My Device" feature, the FTC advises. The agency also recommends users create a lock on their phone, which would require at least a six-digit password, fingerprint scan, or pattern lock. One of the key suggestions offered up by the FTC is that users need to remember to back up the data on their phones.

But once a phone is stolen or lost, accounts that can be accessed by the phone and have passwords automatically remembered should undergo a password change and those accounts that are tied to the phone should be disconnected from the lost or stolen device, the FTC says. The Commission also recommends watch for any notifications that a new device has attached itself to your email or accounts. Another step the FTC advises users take is to notify the carrier that the device is lost or stolen and it could temporarily or permanently disable the SIM card.

Read more about the FTC's smartphone steps here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RetiredUser
0%
100%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
6/12/2017 | 1:59:15 PM
Requiring Multi-factor Authentication Configuration
I'm often on the fence with government oversight and involvement in too many facets of technology.  But I'd welcome any future regulations that make end user configuration of multi-factor authentication on mobile devices a requirement such that your phone can not be set up without it.  Some applications are already set up this way as we know, but to establish a blanket Federal requirement for MFA would be a blow to the casual cybercriminal.

I know such regulatory oversight is not acceptable to many, but considering the critical mass cybercrime has taken on, I can't imagine we're far from such regulations anyway.  Better the InfoSec community define the regulations now than allow them to be defined later by ill-qualified agents.
7 Tips for Infosec Pros Considering A Lateral Career Move
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/21/2020
For Mismanaged SOCs, The Price Is Not Right
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/22/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment:   It's a PEN test of our cloud security.
Current Issue
IT 2020: A Look Ahead
Are you ready for the critical changes that will occur in 2020? We've compiled editor insights from the best of our network (Dark Reading, Data Center Knowledge, InformationWeek, ITPro Today and Network Computing) to deliver to you a look at the trends, technologies, and threats that are emerging in the coming year. Download it today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Organizations have invested in a sweeping array of security technologies to address challenges associated with the growing number of cybersecurity attacks. However, the complexity involved in managing these technologies is emerging as a major problem. Read this report to find out what your peers biggest security challenges are and the technologies they are using to address them.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-7981
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-25
sql.rb in Geocoder before 1.6.1 allows Boolean-based SQL injection when within_bounding_box is used in conjunction with untrusted sw_lat, sw_lng, ne_lat, or ne_lng data.
CVE-2019-0141
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-25
** REJECT ** DO NOT USE THIS CANDIDATE NUMBER. ConsultIDs: none. Reason: This candidate was withdrawn by its CNA. Further investigation showed that it was not a security issue. Notes: none.
CVE-2020-7596
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-25
Codecov npm module before 3.6.2 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary commands via the "gcov-args" argument.
CVE-2020-7980
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-25
Intellian Aptus Web 1.24 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary OS commands via the Q field within JSON data to the cgi-bin/libagent.cgi URI. NOTE: a valid sid cookie for a login to the intellian default account might be needed.
CVE-2012-6613
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-25
D-Link DSR-250N devices with firmware 1.05B73_WW allow Persistent Root Access because of the admin password for the admin account.