Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Threat Intelligence

12/19/2016
10:00 AM
Jai Vijayan
Jai Vijayan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

5 Ways The Cyber-Threat Landscape Shifted In 2016

IoT botnets and turnkey phishing services were just some of the ways the bad guys stayed ahead in 2016
Previous
1 of 6
Next

Change is the one constant in the threat landscape, and cyber events of 2016 served as a reminder of that aphorism in multiple and often painful ways.

Whether it was stealing tens of millions of dollars from financial institutions, locking hospitals and mass-transit systems out of critical data, or assembling deadly attack networks from innocuous consumer devices, adversaries as always found a way to stay one step ahead of the good guys. They continued to surprise and outmaneuver defenders by constantly innovating, improving, and evolving their tactics, techniques and procedures.

Here in no special order are five broad threat categories that evolved, mutated, or grew faster than many had anticipated.

 

Jai Vijayan is a seasoned technology reporter with over 20 years of experience in IT trade journalism. He was most recently a Senior Editor at Computerworld, where he covered information security and data privacy issues for the publication. Over the course of his 20-year ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 6
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
CleanCarKC
50%
50%
CleanCarKC,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2017 | 8:57:46 AM
CleanCarKC

http://www.cleancarkc.com/


Thanks for the article.  Clearly a number of threats out there, but what can the average Joe do to protect house, family and business during these times?
DaveW95101
50%
50%
DaveW95101,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/29/2016 | 2:53:56 PM
Operational Technology at Increased Risk
Excellent article!  It highlights a key point that both threat vectors and threat surfaces are increasing -- much of it directly related to two key trends: 1) BYOD (infected or unsecured personal devices connecting to previously-thought secured networks), and 2) IoT (referring to both greenfield IP-enabled devices and brownfield industrial SCADA devices and controllers -- also known as Operational Technology or OT).

 

Since 2010 when news of the first serious attack of a SCADA system involving Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) -- the attack worm subsequently named "STUXNET" -- there have been many more OT attacks.  Most recently, the Ukranian power grid has been attacked twice, affecting thousands of people in the dead of winter.

 

Without question, Cyber-threats are a serious concern for IP-connected IoT devices.  Yet it's the looming threat to OT devices that really deserves more attention.  I can live quite comfortably without network access.  Living at the same level of comfort without electricity, water, or natural gas service for an extended period of time (along with thousands of other cold, hungry, thirsty people) is quite another matter altogether.
rayray2016
50%
50%
rayray2016,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/20/2016 | 11:26:47 PM
Twenty Motion
This is a very thought provoking article, thanks for sharing it
redteamsecure
50%
50%
redteamsecure,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/20/2016 | 12:14:39 PM
Re: Nobody's Laughing Now
Christian, thanks for the RedTeam Security - redteamsecure.com -  shout out. Also, your comments are exactly on point! Couldn't have said it better ourselves.
RetiredUser
100%
0%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2016 | 10:27:14 AM
Nobody's Laughing Now
This is definitely the decade of the cybercriminal, and it's leading into their century, too.  Any of us close to tech knew we were coming here.  It's the perfect environment for teams like RedTeam Security to thrive in because awareness is higher than ever that security measures are weak at best in most companies, if they even are in place.  Years ago "they" used to laugh at the idea of most of these exploits and toolkits even being possible, considering the idea more fiction than reality.  Nobody's laughing now.  What is funny is that I don't think the creativity of the hacker culture has even yet fully filtered into the cybercriminal toolkit.  Tech innovation is rushing forward and the hacker genius that is coding the next big software projects is also the same genius creating new and unknown exploit opportunities unknowingly, and pushing the boundaries of what we know about software programming so cybercrime can invent more landmarks for the cyber-threat landscape.  Soon, this list is going to have to expand to 10, 15 or 20 highlights as there will be much more activity and more criminal teams out there (more innovative, too) in the years to come.
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Our Endpoint Protection system is a little outdated... 
Current Issue
The Year in Security: 2019
This Tech Digest provides a wrap up and overview of the year's top cybersecurity news stories. It was a year of new twists on old threats, with fears of another WannaCry-type worm and of a possible botnet army of Wi-Fi routers. But 2019 also underscored the risk of firmware and trusted security tools harboring dangerous holes that cybercriminals and nation-state hackers could readily abuse. Read more.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-2319
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-12
HLOS could corrupt CPZ page table memory for S1 managed VMs in Snapdragon Auto, Snapdragon Compute, Snapdragon Connectivity, Snapdragon Consumer IOT, Snapdragon Industrial IOT, Snapdragon Mobile, Snapdragon Wired Infrastructure and Networking in MDM9205, QCS404, QCS605, SDA845, SDM670, SDM710, SDM84...
CVE-2019-2320
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-12
Possible out of bounds write in a MT SMS/SS scenario due to improper validation of array index in Snapdragon Auto, Snapdragon Compute, Snapdragon Consumer IOT, Snapdragon Industrial IOT, Snapdragon IoT, Snapdragon Mobile, Snapdragon Voice & Music, Snapdragon Wearables in APQ8009, APQ8017, APQ805...
CVE-2019-2321
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-12
Incorrect length used while validating the qsee log buffer sent from HLOS which could then lead to remap conflict in Snapdragon Auto, Snapdragon Compute, Snapdragon Connectivity, Snapdragon Consumer Electronics Connectivity, Snapdragon Consumer IOT, Snapdragon Industrial IOT, Snapdragon IoT, Snapdra...
CVE-2019-2337
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-12
While Skipping unknown IES, EMM is reading the buffer even if the no of bytes to read are more than message length which may cause device to shutdown in Snapdragon Auto, Snapdragon Compute, Snapdragon Consumer IOT, Snapdragon Industrial IOT, Snapdragon Mobile, Snapdragon Wearables in APQ8053, APQ809...
CVE-2019-2338
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-12
Crafted image that has a valid signature from a non-QC entity can be loaded which can read/write memory that belongs to the secure world in Snapdragon Auto, Snapdragon Compute, Snapdragon Connectivity, Snapdragon Consumer IOT, Snapdragon Industrial IOT, Snapdragon Mobile, Snapdragon Wired Infrastruc...