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Threat Intelligence

6/5/2018
10:05 AM
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10 Open Source Security Tools You Should Know

Open source tools can be the basis for solid security and intense learning. Here are 10 you should know about for your IT security toolkit.
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The people, products, technologies, and processes that keep businesses secure all come with a cost  — sometimes quite hefty. That is just one of the reasons why so many security professionals spend at least some of their time working with open source security software.

Indeed, whether for learning, experimenting, dealing with new or unique situations, or deploying on a production basis, security professionals have long looked at open source software as a valuable part of their toolkits. 

However, as we all are aware, open source software does not map directly to free software; globally, open source software is a huge business. With companies of various sizes and types offering open source packages and bundles with support and customization, the argument for or against open source software often comes down to its capabilities and quality.

For the tools in this slide show, software quality has been demonstrated by thousands of users who have downloaded and deployed them. The list is broken down, broadly, into categories of visibility, testing, forensics, and compliance. If you don't see your most valuable tool on the list, please add them in the comments.

 

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

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lulzsec
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lulzsec,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/21/2018 | 9:28:50 AM
Re: report on tools in .pdf format
nice OPSEC dude - hope soccer season is going well!

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-kolenko-cissp-ceh-ccsk-m-s-mgmt-8854971
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
6/20/2018 | 12:46:39 PM
Re: report on tools in .pdf format
Great security here - wow, posting a military email address.  YOU just opened up your email a bit.  Hope that was worth the risk.  Don't do THAT ever again. 
Jon M. Kelley
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Jon M. Kelley,
User Rank: Moderator
6/12/2018 | 9:49:10 AM
Paragraph per screen - slowly for Users
Sorry, if I was on your network, I might go through all 11 of your screens. 

Unfortunately I live behind a protective system, and every new page link from DarkReading takes a minute or more to pop up.  The info provided be the multiply is seldom worth the frustration of waiting for it.
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