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Threat Intelligence

2/23/2018
12:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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10 Can't-Miss Talks at Black Hat Asia

With threats featuring everything from nation-states to sleep states, the sessions taking place from March 20-23 in Singapore are relevant to security experts around the world.
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I Don't Want to Sleep Tonight: Subverting Intel TXT with S3 Sleep
'This caught the attention of many of us,' says Giuliano of the Regional Review Board. 'They're tapping into a strategy, a technique that many wouldn't think about: when you're turning your computer off or powering it back on.'
When you shut down and reboot a computer, restarting components takes time, and security devices might be temporarily shut down. However, many PCs, laptops and servers that support enhanced configuration and power interface have six sleeping states, and if the firmware only powers down as far as the S3 sleeping state, it can reactivate security devices somewhat more quickly.
This more wakeful S3 state can be manipulated, however. Jun-Hyeok Park and Seunghun Han, both researchers with the National Security Research Institute of South Korea, will explain how attackers can use the S3 sleeping state to neutralize the Intel Trusted eXecution Environment (TXT), a hardware-based mechanism that validates platform trustworthiness during boot and launch. The attackers target tBoot, which protects the Virtual Machine Monitor and OS, to neutralize Intel TXT. This attack has never been published.
'What they're doing is very innovative, thinking outside the box,' says Giuliano.
(Image: MikhailSh via Shutterstock)

I Don't Want to Sleep Tonight: Subverting Intel TXT with S3 Sleep

"This caught the attention of many of us," says Giuliano of the Regional Review Board. "They're tapping into a strategy, a technique that many wouldn't think about: when you're turning your computer off or powering it back on."

When you shut down and reboot a computer, restarting components takes time, and security devices might be temporarily shut down. However, many PCs, laptops and servers that support enhanced configuration and power interface have six sleeping states, and if the firmware only powers down as far as the S3 sleeping state, it can reactivate security devices somewhat more quickly.

This more wakeful S3 state can be manipulated, however. Jun-Hyeok Park and Seunghun Han, both researchers with the National Security Research Institute of South Korea, will explain how attackers can use the S3 sleeping state to neutralize the Intel Trusted eXecution Environment (TXT), a hardware-based mechanism that validates platform trustworthiness during boot and launch. The attackers target tBoot, which protects the Virtual Machine Monitor and OS, to neutralize Intel TXT. This attack has never been published.

"What they're doing is very innovative, thinking outside the box," says Giuliano.

(Image: MikhailSh via Shutterstock)

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