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3/18/2010
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Japan's Anti-Phishing Council and JPCERT/CC Offer Online Training Game For Phishing Training

Launch a Japanese version of Wombat Security Technologies' Anti-Phishing Phil game to train Japanese user community not to fall for phishing attacks

PITTSBURGH, PA March 18, 2010 " Today Japan's Anti-Phishing Council in cooperation with Japan's Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center (JPCERT/CC) launched a Japanese version of Wombat Security Technologies' Anti-Phishing Phil game to train the Japanese user community not to fall for phishing attacks. The launch is part of a new public education campaign aimed at raising awareness of phishing attacks and educating the public on how to best protect themselves against such attacks.

Anti-Phishing Phil is an engaging online game that teaches people how to avoid falling for increasingly prevalent phishing attacks by training them to identify phishing URLs. Phil is a fun fish character that swims through the ocean searching for worms affixed with a URL that he can decide to eat or reject based on whether the worm is associated with a legitimate web address or a fake phishing site. In contrast to more traditional training solutions, the Phil game has been shown to be significantly more effective in helping people recognize phishing attacks. People who play the game tend to also better retain what they have learned.

"This sale confirms the broad appeal of our training solutions and the ease with which they can be translated into other languages. Given the pre-eminent roles played by Japan's Anti-Phishing Council and JPCERT in cyber security awareness and training in Japan, we are extremely pleased to have been selected to help protect the Japanese public from phishing attacks," said Dr. Norman Sadeh, Founder and CEO of Wombat Security Technologies.

This version of Anti-Phishing Phil launched in Japan is a two-round version of a more complete four-round game that Wombat Security offers to organizations to train their employees and customers. Phil has been licensed to both private sector and government organizations in the US, Canada, Asia and Europe and is one of several highly effective anti-phishing training solutions commercialized by Wombat Security Technologies today.

About Wombat Security Technologies Wombat's cyber security awareness and training solutions are designed to be engaging and interactive and have been scientifically shown to be significantly more effective than traditional training solutions. Wombat's products are easy to deploy and maintain and are used in sectors as diverse as finance, government, telecom, health care, retail, education, transportation & utilities, IT and the service industry. With several hundred thousand users across North America, Europe and Asia, Wombat Security Technologies has established itself as a global leader in cyber security awareness and training. The company's solutions have received many accolades from the computer security industry and media and have been the subject of feature articles in high profile publications such as Scientific American as well as many business and trade publications.

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