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Risk

5/10/2019
03:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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Demystifying the Dark Web: What You Need to Know

The Dark Web and Deep Web are not the same, neither is fully criminal, and more await in this guide to the Internet's mysterious corners.
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What Is the Dark Web?
While it's common for the Dark Web and the Deep Web to be used interchangeably, experts emphasize the two terms mean different things. The Dark Web, which some argue is a subset of the Deep Web, is a smaller slice of the Internet that requires knowledge, tools, and a specialized anonymous network (Tor, for example) to protect users. Most people never use the Dark Web. Not all who do are criminals, either. Many simply want privacy.
Anonymity and location masking are the main appeals of the Dark Web, which is only accessible via networks designed to conceal locations. This is attractive to criminals: Buyers and sellers head to Dark Web marketplaces to exchange digital currencies for guns, exploits, drugs, credit card numbers, stolen personal data, and myriad other types of virtual and physical contraband. Oleg Bondarenko, director of international research at FireEye, says the main intention of the Dark Web is illicit.
'The Dark Web - or DarkNet is another term to use - is a smaller portion of the Deep Web where the Tor browser is still required, but the whole purpose of it is to trade illicit goods,' he says, citing weapons, drugs, malware, credit card dumps, and access to organizations as examples of illegal activity.
But criminals aren't the only people who rely on the Dark Web. 'Obviously, [websites] aren't only used for malicious purposes,' Flashpoint's Camacho says. It's also popular among political dissidents, activists, and others who seek anonymity online. Some people may want to appear to be from somewhere else because data is blocked in their countries, for example, or they could be seeking illegal or dangerous information, such as access to abortion or mental health, Terbium Labs' Wilson notes.
(Image: Mimadeo - stock.adobe.com)

What Is the Dark Web?

While it's common for the Dark Web and the Deep Web to be used interchangeably, experts emphasize the two terms mean different things. The Dark Web, which some argue is a subset of the Deep Web, is a smaller slice of the Internet that requires knowledge, tools, and a specialized anonymous network (Tor, for example) to protect users. Most people never use the Dark Web. Not all who do are criminals, either. Many simply want privacy.

Anonymity and location masking are the main appeals of the Dark Web, which is only accessible via networks designed to conceal locations. This is attractive to criminals: Buyers and sellers head to Dark Web marketplaces to exchange digital currencies for guns, exploits, drugs, credit card numbers, stolen personal data, and myriad other types of virtual and physical contraband. Oleg Bondarenko, director of international research at FireEye, says the main intention of the Dark Web is illicit.

"The Dark Web or DarkNet is another term to use is a smaller portion of the Deep Web where the Tor browser is still required, but the whole purpose of it is to trade illicit goods," he says, citing weapons, drugs, malware, credit card dumps, and access to organizations as examples of illegal activity.

But criminals aren't the only people who rely on the Dark Web. "Obviously, [websites] aren't only used for malicious purposes," Flashpoint's Camacho says. It's also popular among political dissidents, activists, and others who seek anonymity online. Some people may want to appear to be from somewhere else because data is blocked in their countries, for example, or they could be seeking illegal or dangerous information, such as access to abortion or mental health, Terbium Labs' Wilson notes.

(Image: Mimadeo stock.adobe.com)

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matty37
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matty37,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/29/2019 | 9:08:32 AM
the dark web
But isn't it right? I do think that most people don't have their fears out of nowhere, and this perception about the dark web was created based on something. It might be not as bad as it's portrayed, but it's definitely not a safe place as well. I would like to try it out and see how it looks like, but I'm currently still debating if it's worth it. I heard that you have to use Tor to access it, although I also have SurfsharkVPN; hopefully, that will increase my safety if I decide to take a glimpse
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