Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

4/28/2009
01:21 AM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
50%
50%

Just Because Security Budget Takes A Hit, Doesn't Mean Security Has To

At last week's RSA Conference in San Francisco, there was as much talk about the economy as there was on IT security. And while the show appeared to pull a healthy number of attendees, at times the show floor seemed filled with more vendor reps and consultants, than IT buyers. But a few studies released last week show while vendor's may like to hype fear, the infosec economy certainly isn't all gloom and doom.

At last week's RSA Conference in San Francisco, there was as much talk about the economy as there was on IT security. And while the show appeared to pull a healthy number of attendees, at times the show floor seemed filled with more vendor reps and consultants, than IT buyers. But a few studies released last week show while vendor's may like to hype fear, the infosec economy certainly isn't all gloom and doom.From Tim Wilson, over at DarkReading.com:

More than 70 percent of IT security professionals said they have been forced to cut their budgets during the past six months to adjust for the economic downturn, according to a report released by (ISC)2, an association of security professionals. Approximately half of the respondents said they have made at least one layoff in the security department.

The data runs counter to several other studies published earlier this year, in which most security professionals had said their spending would hold steady or increase in 2009. "The current economic conditions have had an effect on all professions, including information security," said Lee Kushner, president of LJ Kushner & Associates, a national IT recruiting firm.

The data in the (ISC)2 report is supported by a separate report issued last week by MetroSITE, a security consulting firm. MetroSITE found that 72 percent of companies surveyed expect to make downward revisions of their security budgets during the remainder of the year.

None of this data surprises me. With fewer new IT initiatives, and those that do survive the budget cuts being less ambitious, there's going to be less need for new security gear. And it fairs well with my belief that IT security is recession resilient, not recession proof.

But the steady head-pounding of new regulations and waves of attacks that just don't let up: the need and the budget for infosec isn't going away, and it's not going to be cut as deep as other areas of IT investment.

So, maybe, instead of buying new security technologies because they're the latest cool thing -- invest in security equipment that helps to consolidate vendors and processes where possible and makes sense. Take the time to start moving security testing into the early stages of software development and throughout QA testing; look for ways to automate vulnerability assessments and patch deployment; seek out and destroy redundant internal regulatory and compliance tests; and put into place an effective and visibility security awareness program. Your people are probably a much weaker link in your IT security chain than many areas of your infrastructure. Now's a good time to strengthen them through awareness and steady security reminders.

Just because your budget may have taken a hit, doesn't mean your risk posture has to slouch.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Overcoming the Challenge of Shorter Certificate Lifespans
Mike Cooper, Founder & CEO of Revocent,  10/15/2020
7 Tips for Choosing Security Metrics That Matter
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer,  10/19/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-27621
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
The FileImporter extension in MediaWiki through 1.35.0 was not properly attributing various user actions to a specific user's IP address. Instead, for various actions, it would report the IP address of an internal Wikimedia Foundation server by omitting X-Forwarded-For data. This resulted in an inab...
CVE-2020-27620
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
The Cosmos Skin for MediaWiki through 1.35.0 has stored XSS because MediaWiki messages were not being properly escaped. This is related to wfMessage and Html::rawElement, as demonstrated by CosmosSocialProfile::getUserGroups.
CVE-2020-27619
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
In Python 3 through 3.9.0, the Lib/test/multibytecodec_support.py CJK codec tests call eval() on content retrieved via HTTP.
CVE-2020-17454
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
WSO2 API Manager 3.1.0 and earlier has reflected XSS on the "publisher" component's admin interface. More precisely, it is possible to inject an XSS payload into the owner POST parameter, which does not filter user inputs. By putting an XSS payload in place of a valid Owner Name, a modal b...
CVE-2020-24421
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
Adobe InDesign version 15.1.2 (and earlier) is affected by a memory corruption vulnerability due to insecure handling of a malicious .indd file, potentially resulting in arbitrary code execution in the context of the current user. User interaction is required to exploit this vulnerability.