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9 Must-Know Java Security Facts

More than half of all Java users are still using Java 6, which Oracle officially retired last month. Is it time for a consumer recall?

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Calling all computer users: Do you know if one or more Java browser plug-ins are installed on your Windows, Mac OS X or Linux system and, if so, what versions do you have?

Hundreds of millions of PCs now run Java 7, as well as Java 6, and in the face of active attacks against bugs in the software, Oracle this week issued emergency security updates for both. Yet half of all Java users are still running Java 6, which Oracle officially retired last month. That highlights the fact that that consumers as well as businesses don't understand the "patch-or-perish" imperative surrounding Java use, and thus their systems remain at risk of being exploited by attackers.

Here are nine related security concerns, as well as solutions:

1. Regular Java Attacks Will Continue

In the wake of active attacks against zero-day vulnerabilities in Java that were being exploited to install McRAT malware, Oracle this week released Java 7 update 17 (it skipped issuing an update 16) and Java 6 update 43 (skipping update 42). Both updates patch two critical bugs, one of which attackers were exploiting to fully compromise vulnerable PCs. Needless to say, Oracle and security experts at large have recommended that Java users upgrade as soon as possible.

Attacks against Java are increasing. Chaouki Bekrar, CEO and head of research for French vulnerability seller Vupen Security told Kaspersky's Lab's Threatpost that the increased number of Java exploits is being driven by their relative ease and low cost of development. "We see that criminals are moving from Flash to Java. We don't see many Flash exploits in the wild these days," he said.

Furthermore, security experts are now counting the time between new Java zero-day attacks being discovered not in months or weeks, but days. As of Friday, for example, only one day had elapsed since the latest discovery of a new zero-day exploit that was targeting Java users. Notably, veteran Java bug hunter Adam Gowdiak, head of research firm Security Explorations in Poland, earlier this week spotted five new vulnerabilities in Java 7, which he's reported to Oracle.

2. Oracle Vulnerability Patching Response Speed Improving

A string of zero-day vulnerabilities in recent months have left Java users exposed to active attacks, with no mitigation recourse except to disable the software, pending an update from Oracle. At the same time, Oracle took flak for failing to publicly address the ongoing vulnerabilities or deal with them in a timely manner.

To its credit, Oracle in late January promised to change its ways, and in fact switched to a much more aggressive updating regimen, as evidenced by the company having already issued three Java updates this year.

3. Recommendation: Disable Java Plug-in Whenever Possible

No matter how recently Java has been patched, most security experts recommend disabling the Java browser plug-in whenever possible. "For enterprises, IT security departments should disable it and have the ability to do so," said Rob Rachwald, senior director of research at FireEye, via email. "If an enterprise security team hasn't thought about Java disablement, that would not be a good thing."

For people who must use the Java browser plug-in, security experts recommend installing it on a secondary browser, and then only using that browser with trusted website. That approach won't block all types of attacks -- such as watering-hole attacks that compromised a popular iOS development website and used it to infect mobile developers' Mac OS X systems and compromise Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter -- but it might help.

4. Oracle Has Retired Java 6

This week's release of Java 6 update 43 served as an unusual coda for Java 6, which Oracle officially retired last month, saying that Java 6 update 41 would be the last. But Oracle wisely reconsidered -- in the wake of an active attack campaign being launched against Java 6 -- and issued an update for Java 7 as well as Java 6.

How long will the Java 6 updates continue? Good question, because the first time Oracle fails to patch a Java 6 bug that's being actively exploited by attackers, hundreds of millions of PC users will be at risk.

5. Java 6 Use Remains Widespread, Also At Work

That's because altogether, Java 6 and Java 7 are now installed on over a billion PCs. Furthermore, according to Java browser plug-in market share statistics gathered by StatOwl.com, which analyzes the system configuration of numerous website visitors -- predominantly to U.S sites -- at least 47% of Java users are running Java 6, and 15% have Java 7 installed. But StatOwl said it wasn't able to detect the Java version in 33% of cases, which may be the result of the Java 7 update 10 security enhancements that mask whether Java is installed.

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tuyesaka93601
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tuyesaka93601,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2013 | 4:26:10 AM
re: 9 Must-Know Java Security Facts
The sad thing is there are companies such as ADP who do not support Java 7 to access their timecard systems. So if an enterprise uses ADP how can they do timekeeping and payroll and remain up to date on Java???
Petar Zivovic
50%
50%
Petar Zivovic,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2013 | 6:04:32 PM
re: 9 Must-Know Java Security Facts
The fact of the matter is, Java 7 breaks some apps that require Java 6 to run. Until our vendors (yes, more than one) can update their code, we're stuck maintaining the older version on our systems.
mbourque597
50%
50%
mbourque597,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/17/2013 | 3:44:09 AM
re: 9 Must-Know Java Security Facts
Two fortune 500 vendors, to cure instability in their application, have had us revert back to a specific java 6 release stating that it was the last stable release of Java. It appears that Oracle has not gained the trust of their peers which leaves us in a precarious position.
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