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10 Tips for More Secure Mobile Devices

Mobile devices can be more secure than traditional desktop machines - but only if the proper policies and practices are in place and in use.

Computing and mobile computing are, to an ever-growing degree, the same thing. According to research by StoneTemple, at the beginning of 2018, 63% of Web traffic comes from mobile devices; they expect the number to pass 2/3 of all traffic by the end of the year.

Most users, and most security professionals, seem to think that mobile platforms are inherently more secure than traditional desktop and laptop computers. In many circumstances that's correct, but that assumption can lead to behaviors that carry significant risks.

Fortunately, there are steps a security team can take secure mobile devices: Some of these are actions that the security team should take, while others are actions that should be taught to users. Many of these steps fall squarely in the "it just makes common sense" category of things. That doesn't mean that security pros and users alike don't need a reminder to check for each of these to be on their list of positive behaviors — and on the list of results to be enforced by policy on all devices.

There are many behaviors that can contribute to mobile device security or risk. We'd be interested in hearing about the behaviors that you see as important — but that didn't make our list. Use the comment section to let us know what we missed.

About the Author(s)

Curtis Franklin, Principal Analyst, Omdia

Senior Analyst, Omdia

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Analyst at Omdia, focusing on enterprise security management. Previously, he was senior editor of Dark Reading, editor of Light Reading's Security Now, and executive editor, technology, at InformationWeek, where he was also executive producer of InformationWeek's online radio and podcast episodes

Curtis has been writing about technologies and products in computing and networking since the early 1980s. He has been on staff and contributed to technology-industry publications including BYTE, ComputerWorld, CEO, Enterprise Efficiency, ChannelWeb, Network Computing, InfoWorld, PCWorld, Dark Reading, and ITWorld.com on subjects ranging from mobile enterprise computing to enterprise security and wireless networking.

Curtis is the author of thousands of articles, the co-author of five books, and has been a frequent speaker at computer and networking industry conferences across North America and Europe. His most recent books, Cloud Computing: Technologies and Strategies of the Ubiquitous Data Center, and Securing the Cloud: Security Strategies for the Ubiquitous Data Center, with co-author Brian Chee, are published by Taylor and Francis.

When he's not writing, Curtis is a painter, photographer, cook, and multi-instrumentalist musician. He is active in running, amateur radio (KG4GWA), the MakerFX maker space in Orlando, FL, and is a certified Florida Master Naturalist.

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