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2/10/2020
11:40 AM
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6 Factors That Raise the Stakes for IoT Security

Developments that exacerbate the risk and complicate making Internet of Things devices more secure.
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The enterprise is finally coming to realize 
just how risky Internet of Things (IoT) devices are to their security postures. Whether it comes from unencrypted communication with devices, hard-coded passwords, vulnerability-ridden unmanaged devices, or insecure configurations, a huge flaw always seems to be lurking around the corner with regard to IoT deployments.
 
It's only natural for new-ish technology. IoT is following a common progression in security maturation that's happened so many times in everything from Wi-Fi to Web apps.
 
However, as IoT progresses, a number of factors add a greater depth to the IoT problem. Some up the ante considerably by putting way more at risk -- either in consequence or cost -- when an IoT device is compromised. Other factors expand the risk surface by exacerbating already extant vulnerabilities in the IoT ecosystem.
 
Either way, read on for some of the most common factors that raise the stakes for IoT and make the problem more acute within the enterprise.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio
 

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DavidS950U01
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DavidS950U01,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2020 | 1:08:42 AM
Question about IoT and smart communities; government duty to regulate and protect.
The article names deployments that could be attcked, such as factories, hospitals or body-connected IoT devices, and facilities. I am curious about the negative potentials presented in the smart communities scenarios. What are the dangers? Paralysis of IoT-dependent traffic control and surveillance, for example? And if not paralysis, what about misdirection (a la Stuxnet)?

Next: it's nice that government regulations will role out in 2020--but where? In this country? With the vaunted repeal of 1200 (and counting) "job-killing" regulations that were originally created to protect public health and safety, exactly which competent agency employees remain to do the regulating? (Think State Department, EPA, CDC, etc.) I think it prudent to write to our elected representatives and make the case for, let's say, following the European example.
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