Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint

5/8/2019
10:30 AM
Joshua Goldfarb
Joshua Goldfarb
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail vvv
50%
50%

The Fine Line of Feedback: 6 Tips for Talking to Security Pros

Feedback is a two-way street in terms of giving, receiving, and knowing how to give and receive.

Feedback is important to all of us. It helps us learn, grow, mature, and better adjust to our surroundings. If we learn how to receive feedback well, we will be able to improve, whether it be in our personal life or in our professional career in cybersecurity. On the other hand, if we don't receive feedback well, it can hold us back.

That said, providing feedback is a sensitive and difficult topic that can take a lifetime to master. While I haven't yet mastered this skill, I know a thing or two about the personalities of security professionals. It is in this spirit that I offer six tips for giving positive feedback to security professionals.

Tip 1: Pick your battles: Knowing when to engage is an important skill in life, including when it comes to providing feedback. If you never provide any feedback on anything, nothing will ever change or improve. On the other hand, if you always provide feedback on every little thing, people feel criticized and micromanaged. When is the right time to provide feedback? In general, only in instances when feedback actually makes a difference. By that, I mean when changing something will have a direct impact on the efficiency or effectiveness of the security program — for example, requesting that a specific, noisy alert be tuned to reduce false positives and improve the efficiency of the security team. Or fixing a broken process in order to improve the overall performance of the security team.

Tip 2: Suggest: When providing feedback, it's always more helpful to suggest a practical, tangible solution, rather than expressing displeasure with what is currently happening. You may be absolutely right in your critique, but if it doesn't come with a practical alternative, it's really just complaining. A viable option goes a long way toward getting results.

Tip 3: Never assume: We are all human, and we all have our own subjective biases. That being said, feedback needs to be offered on the basis of facts and objectivity. Think you understand how someone is accomplishing a given task? Verify that your understanding is the truth. Feel like you know someone's motivation for doing something or what that person is after? Better check that feeling out against the facts. Assumptions don't help with providing feedback. They only make the receiver focus on assumptions versus the actual focus of the feedback. This often leads to unnecessary conflict or to taking things personally. Neither helps solve the problem.

Tip 4: Don't jump to conclusions: It's far too easy to connect dots that aren't actually connected. When it comes to providing feedback, we need to make sure that we really understand the facts and reality of the situation we're addressing. Otherwise, we put the value of our feedback at risk. It only takes one inaccuracy for someone who is not interested in or receptive to our feedback to rationalize dismissing it.

Tip 5: If it ain't broke, don't fix it: This colloquial proverb offers some very wise advice for those of us in the security profession. There are some people in our field who seem to want to provide feedback about just about everything. This feedback seems to come whether or not it was asked for, and whether or not it is relevant to the discussion at hand. The problem with this is that sometimes, things actually work as they should. If a process, technology, capability, employee, or anything else is working just as it should, save your breath. Hold back those words and don't provide feedback in those instances. Resources are scarce in security and should be invested in areas where they can have an impact by making a change — not in areas that don't need any fixing.

Tip 6: If you dish it, take it: I've met too many people who provide plenty of feedback but cannot accept any of it. By accepting feedback in the same spirit that it is given, you'll find that not only will you improve personally and professionally but that others will put more value on the feedback that you provide to them.

Related Content:

 

 

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two cybersecurity summits at Interop 2019. Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the Interop agenda here.

Josh (Twitter: @ananalytical) is an experienced information security leader who works with enterprises to mature and improve their enterprise security programs.  Previously, Josh served as VP, CTO - Emerging Technologies at FireEye and as Chief Security Officer for ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-5615
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-04
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in [Calendar01] free edition ver1.0.0 and [Calendar02] free edition ver1.0.0 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-5616
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-04
[Calendar01], [Calendar02], [PKOBO-News01], [PKOBO-vote01], [Telop01], [Gallery01], [CalendarForm01], and [Link01] [Calendar01] free edition ver1.0.0, [Calendar02] free edition ver1.0.0, [PKOBO-News01] free edition ver1.0.3 and earlier, [PKOBO-vote01] free edition ver1.0.1 and earlier, [Telop01] fre...
CVE-2020-5617
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-04
Privilege escalation vulnerability in SKYSEA Client View Ver.12.200.12n to 15.210.05f allows an attacker to obtain unauthorized privileges and modify/obtain sensitive information or perform unintended operations via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-11583
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
A GET-based XSS reflected vulnerability in Plesk Obsidian 18.0.17 allows remote unauthenticated users to inject arbitrary JavaScript, HTML, or CSS via a GET parameter.
CVE-2020-11584
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
A GET-based XSS reflected vulnerability in Plesk Onyx 17.8.11 allows remote unauthenticated users to inject arbitrary JavaScript, HTML, or CSS via a GET parameter.