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Privacy

4/30/2018
08:25 PM
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WhatsApp Founder to Depart Facebook Amid Privacy, Encryption Dispute

Jan Koum also plans to step down from Facebook's board of directors.

Jan Koum, the founder of WhatsApp who sold his private messaging app to Facebook four years ago for $19 billion, reportedly plans to step down in the wake of increasing concerns over the parent company's intentions for its user data as well efforts to weaken its encryption.

The Washington Post today reported that Koum also will leave his post on Facebook's board of directors. Koum later wrote in a Facebook post that it "is time for me to move on," but did not provide a timeline for his departures or any details.

According to The Post, the recent news of Cambridge Analytica's abuse of Facebook users' data exacerbated Koum's discontent with how Facebook handles user data, given WhatsApp's promise to its users that it would continue to emphasize and protect their privacy and data in the aftermath of the acquisition by Facebook.

Read more here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2018 | 8:58:04 PM
Distancing
Not surprising, it seems like it would be prudent to distance yourself from this debacle if you want to look towards future endeavors from a business perspective.
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