Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint

4/7/2017
09:00 AM
50%
50%

New Malware Deliberately Destroys Unsecured IoT Devices

Motive behind BrickerBot puzzles experts who think it maybe the work of a vigilante.

Cybersecurity experts are warning of a new type of malware strain that uses known default user credentials to attack unsecured Internet of Things (IoT) devices and destroy them, reports Bleeping Computer.

Discovered by cybersecurity firm Radware, BrickerBot has two versions – BrickerBot.1 and BrickerBot.2 – and was found to be active since March 20, targeting only Linux BusyBox-based devices with Telnet ports left open.

This malware renders devices inoperable within seconds of infecting them through PDoS (Permanent Denial of Service) or "phlashing" attacks. The two versions work in the same manner but through different sets of commands; while BrickerBot.1 comes through worldwide IPs likely assigned to Ubiquiti network devices, BrickerBot.2 attacks are hidden behind Tor exit nodes and difficult to trace.

The attacker’s motive has confounded cybersecurity experts because it destroys without benefiting the destroyer. They suspect it could be the work of a vigilante who wants to alert users to unsecured devices.

Victor Gevers of GDI.foundation is however critical of the approach and believes that, "Instead of bricking you could also allow the devices to still work and just patch the vulnerability.”

Click here for details.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
JesseP882
50%
50%
JesseP882,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/8/2017 | 7:34:58 PM
You cant fix stupid
Look, I understand the perspective that as people in IT Security we should make it our buisness to fix everyones issue. But you can't fix stupid nor can you protect everyone from themselves. Sorry Victor Gevers. But even in law enforcement, you can put as many fixes (checkstops) in place as possible, work to get laws setup and rules. But when someone decides to get drunk then drive behind the wheel, even police cannot stop every idiot drunk from killing innocents.

This malware, while appearing to be malicious in nature, is truly epic. No one is hurt, besides the victims pockbook/wallet, and nothing is gained from the attack. And the only true lesson learned here is this: Change the default password.

 

Awesome! And if buddy goes, gets new hardware and then refuses to change the password which again results in another infection and bricking of hardware again.... Sucks to be him.

What can we do? We cannot protect against stupid. Only educate and inform. We could be dictators. But then we would be no better than Microsoft was back in the day or Apple when the systems were locked down to prevent mods. So important lessons need to be learned. Always change the default password. Failure to do so will result in your own monetary loss due to your own idiocy.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/7/2017 | 2:31:11 PM
Push in the right direction
Hopefully this will push vendors in the right direction to not supply their devices with default credentials.
HackerOne Drops Mobile Voting App Vendor Voatz
Dark Reading Staff 3/30/2020
Limited-Time Free Offers to Secure the Enterprise Amid COVID-19
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  3/31/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
Data breaches and regulations have forced organizations to pay closer attention to the security incident response function. However, security leaders may be overestimating their ability to detect and respond to security incidents. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-6994
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
A buffer overflow vulnerability was found in some devices of Hirschmann Automation and Control HiOS and HiSecOS. The vulnerability is due to improper parsing of URL arguments. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by specially crafting HTTP requests to overflow an internal buffer. The followi...
CVE-2020-8637
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
A SQL injection vulnerability in TestLink 1.9.20 allows attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands in dragdroptreenodes.php via the node_id parameter.
CVE-2020-8638
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
A SQL injection vulnerability in TestLink 1.9.20 allows attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands in planUrgency.php via the urgency parameter.
CVE-2020-8639
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
An unrestricted file upload vulnerability in keywordsImport.php in TestLink 1.9.20 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code by uploading a file with an executable extension. This allows an authenticated attacker to upload a malicious file (containing PHP code to execute operating system com...
CVE-2020-10601
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
VISAM VBASE Editor version 11.5.0.2 and VBASE Web-Remote Module allow weak hashing algorithm and insecure permissions which may allow a local attacker to bypass the password-protected mechanism through brute-force attacks, cracking techniques, or overwriting the password hash.