theDocumentId => 1334809 8 Ways to Authenticate Without Passwords

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5/28/2019
12:00 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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8 Ways to Authenticate Without Passwords

Passwordless authentication has a shot at becoming more ubiquitous in the next few years. We take a look at where things stand at the moment.
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Ping Identity

Ping Identity CISO Robb Reck says the promise of future continuous, risk-based authentication is better security and improved convenience. By using multifactor authentication, Ping Identity can use sensors in people's phones and laptops to continuously authenticate users and allow them to access their resources based on the quality of that ongoing trust. This process only calls for authentication when trust is lost, and then only requests the level of assurance required for the type of transaction the user wants to make.

'The key to a successful end-user experience is providing it regardless of the device the consumers are connecting from,' Reck says. 'A huge portion of consumer-facing businesses, such as online retail, have moved to the smartphone, so any customer experience initiative needs to consider that platform from the start.'

Ping plans to replace passwords with push notifications to mobile devices and offer scannable QR codes, which produce one-time passcodes for users, Reck says. With the PingID mobile SDK, enterprises can balance security and convenience for customers by embedding advanced MFA functionality directly into their own iOS or Android mobile apps. This lets organizations allow their customers to log in with easier methods than having to remember a password.

The same goes for laptops and PCs, Reck adds. Organizations are replacing passwords and supplementing them in the sign-on process to these devices.

'By adding multifactor authentication to processes like Windows login, organizations can either remove password requirements and instead have employees use a friendlier range of mobile push authentication methods, or use those in addition to passwords for a more secure logon process,' Reck says. 'We're also implementing Windows Hello as an authentication factor in PingID with the same intention.'

Image Source: Ping Identity

Ping Identity

Ping Identity CISO Robb Reck says the promise of future continuous, risk-based authentication is better security and improved convenience. By using multifactor authentication, Ping Identity can use sensors in people's phones and laptops to continuously authenticate users and allow them to access their resources based on the quality of that ongoing trust. This process only calls for authentication when trust is lost, and then only requests the level of assurance required for the type of transaction the user wants to make.

"The key to a successful end-user experience is providing it regardless of the device the consumers are connecting from," Reck says. "A huge portion of consumer-facing businesses, such as online retail, have moved to the smartphone, so any customer experience initiative needs to consider that platform from the start."

Ping plans to replace passwords with push notifications to mobile devices and offer scannable QR codes, which produce one-time passcodes for users, Reck says. With the PingID mobile SDK, enterprises can balance security and convenience for customers by embedding advanced MFA functionality directly into their own iOS or Android mobile apps. This lets organizations allow their customers to log in with easier methods than having to remember a password.

The same goes for laptops and PCs, Reck adds. Organizations are replacing passwords and supplementing them in the sign-on process to these devices.

"By adding multifactor authentication to processes like Windows login, organizations can either remove password requirements and instead have employees use a friendlier range of mobile push authentication methods, or use those in addition to passwords for a more secure logon process," Reck says. "We're also implementing Windows Hello as an authentication factor in PingID with the same intention."

Image Source: Ping Identity

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ScottyTheMenace
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ScottyTheMenace,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2019 | 5:46:08 PM
Touch ID is not passwordless
Not sure if it was your intent to suggest that it was, but Apple's Touch ID is not passwordless.

In iOS, you still have to set a passcode, and it seems to be the passcode that actually unlocks your device. All Touch ID does is use your fingerprint to fill the passcode into the field. (I don't know the technical details to know that's the case, but it sure seems like that's what's happening.) You're also forced to use the passcode seemingly at random (though it's probably time delimited) and to activate Touch ID after a restart.

I love using Touch ID—it's quite convenient—but its dependence on a typed passcode actually encourages users to use weak passcodes that are easily remembered since they'll eventually need to type it in, and typing the passcode* 984ELBMYAq[s@2B%t5sM+5{j=9AYH__4jqDr on a touch keyboard is not real fun.

 

* Generated just now. Not any of my passwords. C'mon now, do I look that dumb? DON'T ANSWER THAT!
wibblewibble
100%
0%
wibblewibble,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/30/2019 | 7:49:18 AM
SQRL
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