Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Careers & People

2/21/2017
11:10 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

8 Valuable Security Certifications For 2017

A security credential could be the step towards your next job title. But which one to get?
Previous
1 of 9
Next

(Image: wk1003mike via Shutterstock)

(Image: wk1003mike via Shutterstock)

Security certifications aren't mandatory for all industry experts, but they can make a difference in applying for new roles. (ISC)² CEO David Shearer says they're a "must-have" when looking at candidates on paper.

"Statistically, someone who goes through the formal [certification] process tends to be a candidate with more educational experience," he says, and certifications give professionals the "deep dive" expertise they need to drive their careers.

There are definitely people who learn from experience and fall outside the rule, however. "There are always exceptions; people who don't have certifications who are fantastic at what they do," Shearer notes.

But a certification gives you broader knowledge, he says. "You need to think broad and you need to think deep," he says of building security expertise.

This depth is what separates security certificates from certifications, which "have a different bar you have to go through compared with a certificate," he says, citing a report from the Institute for Credentialing Excellence. Certificates typically don't evaluate experiential performance. "There's a lot more rigor that goes into a credential as opposed to a certificate."

While the distinction doesn't necessarily mean certificates are bad, it's simply something to bear in mind because they are designed to evaluate different things and therefore have a different structure.

It's important for businesses to recognize the difference between certificates and certification programs, says Shearer. People commonly use "certificate" and "certification" as synonymous terms.

Businesses who want professionals to demonstrate established knowledge or skills should focus on certification programs, which aim to validate competency through a structured assessment system. Certificate programs provide instruction so participants acquire skills in a specific area. While certification content is typically broad in scope; certificate content is much narrower.

Here's a look at some of the key certifications for security experts today. Do you have any of these certifications? Thinking about them? Feel free to share your thoughts and keep the conversation going in the comments.

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 9
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
3pred
50%
50%
3pred,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/6/2017 | 2:43:57 PM
Re: Are you kidding?
I was not familiar with the CSX.  I will add that to my list of certs that I recommend people getting started. Seems like the training would be much more engaging.
3pred
50%
50%
3pred,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/6/2017 | 2:43:42 PM
Re: Are you kidding?
I was not familiar with the CSX.  I will add that to my list of certs that I recommend people getting started. Seems like the training would be much more engaging.
cruzerkk
50%
50%
cruzerkk,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/4/2017 | 11:13:21 PM
CompTIA CSA+
CompTIA have started their new CyberSecurity certification CSA+ from mid February. Anyone with any reviews on that ? Is it worth my time and money ?
utsec12
50%
50%
utsec12,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2017 | 12:56:48 PM
Its time for InfoSec convergence
All good Certs, as many others are to the feild (CCNP, CEH), but with all of the splintered technologies exponentially growing there is not enought time, or money for anyone to earn that more than a few of them.  Even though companies today want you to know a bit of ALL of them, for under 100k/yr???  Good article though.
alf1955
20%
80%
alf1955,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2017 | 11:11:14 AM
Are you kidding?
Kelly, when you wrote this article, you really should have taken longer than the 90 seconds, or less, you apparently spent on your research and analysis of this topic.  GSEC, Security+, CWSP... really?! :-(  How about CRISC, CSX, CCFP along with a myriad of other much better certs?!  Well, I guess everyone's entitled to one dud, Kelly...  ;-)

  I sincerely hope that your future efforts will be more in line with the quality and value I had come to expect from you through the articles that I have greatly enjoyed from you in the past...  :-)
wait for it...
100%
0%
wait for it...,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2017 | 9:45:46 AM
Re: Missing Qualifications??
This article is on certifications, not education. A Master's would definitely be good, but takes a few years. (If I am understanding correctly what you meant.)
tbrit
100%
0%
tbrit,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/23/2017 | 9:55:59 AM
Missing Qualifications??
I know Dark Reading is primarily a US based entity, but how about MSc Cyber security?

I am currently going through mine and a large number of my cohort have done the CISSP as something to do between Modules.

There are a few who have tried to do the same with OSCP however have found that it takes up a lot more spare time to complete.

Surely it would be worth more than many of these certs as it encompasses the whole range of IT security.
A Realistic Threat Model for the Masses
Lysa Myers, Security Researcher, ESET,  10/9/2019
USB Drive Security Still Lags
Dark Reading Staff 10/9/2019
Virginia a Hot Spot For Cybersecurity Jobs
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  10/9/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
2019 Online Malware and Threats
2019 Online Malware and Threats
As cyberattacks become more frequent and more sophisticated, enterprise security teams are under unprecedented pressure to respond. Is your organization ready?
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-14832
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
A flaw was found in the Keycloak REST API before version 8.0.0 where it would permit user access from a realm the user was not configured. An authenticated attacker with knowledge of a user id could use this flaw to access unauthorized information or to carry out further attacks.
CVE-2017-10022
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
In haml versions prior to version 5.0.0.beta.2, when using user input to perform tasks on the server, characters like < > " ' must be escaped properly. In this case, the ' character was missed. An attacker can manipulate the input to introduce additional attributes, potentially executing ...
CVE-2019-10759
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
safer-eval before 1.3.4 are vulnerable to Arbitrary Code Execution. A payload using constructor properties can escape the sandbox and execute arbitrary code.
CVE-2019-10760
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
safer-eval before 1.3.2 are vulnerable to Arbitrary Code Execution. A payload using constructor properties can escape the sandbox and execute arbitrary code.
CVE-2019-17397
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
In the DoorDash application through 11.5.2 for Android, the username and password are stored in the log during authentication, and may be available to attackers via logcat.