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11/23/2016
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Kelly Sheridan
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8 Books Security Pros Should Read

Hunting for a good resource on the security industry? Check out these classics from the experts to learn more about hacking, defense, cryptography and more.
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(Image: Carballo via Shutterstock)

(Image: Carballo via Shutterstock)

Calling all infosec pros: What are the best books in your security library?

On a second thought, let's take a step back. A better question may be: Do you have a security library at all? If not, why?

Security professionals have countless blogs, videos, and podcasts to stay updated on rapidly changing news and trends. Books, on the other hand, are valuable resources for diving into a specific area of security to build knowledge and broaden your expertise.

Because the security industry is so complex, it's impossible to cram everything there is to know in a single tome. Authors generally focus their works on single topics including cryptography, network security modeling, and security assessment.

Consider one of the reads on this list of recommendations, Threat Modeling: Designing for Security. This book is based on the idea that while all security pros model threats, few have developed expertise in the area.

Author Adam Shostack aims to educate readers on the subject through chapters like "Checklists for Diving In and Threat Modeling," "Structured Approaches to Threat Modeling," and "Properties of Attack Libraries." It's handy for both beginner and advanced security pros to gain a foothold on a specific topic.

Whether you're seeking a career change or simply want to learn something new, it's worth your time to curl up with one of these recommended security reads. Are there any suggestions you would add to this list?

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio
 

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Charlotte Galyon
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Charlotte Galyon,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2020 | 7:08:23 AM
It's very cool!
It's very cool!
LisaB845
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LisaB845,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/24/2017 | 5:30:57 AM
professional logo design
you are so good at this, thanks for the book tips!
silvanosales
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silvanosales,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/25/2017 | 11:11:45 AM
Re: novinhas
good
DarkReader007
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DarkReader007,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/1/2017 | 3:22:36 PM
Keep Track
Thank you
jonesj26
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jonesj26,
User Rank: Author
12/14/2016 | 9:12:56 AM
Good list -- here are some more
Good list.  For those who want to expand into risk management roles, these two are also good reads:

* How to Measure Anything In Cybersecurity

* Measuring and Managing Information Risk: A FAIR Approach

 
Nightwolf76
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Nightwolf76,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2016 | 4:05:58 PM
Re: A couple
I think you mean David Thiel.  I'll refrain from posting my opinion on Peter Thiel.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
11/25/2016 | 5:25:42 PM
A couple
Numerous books come to mind to further suggest.  Spam Nation by Brian Krebs highlights the history of the pharma-spam industry.  And a while ago I reviewed iOS Application Security by Peter Thiel -- which is a decent reference book.
ydm.mendez
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ydm.mendez,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/23/2016 | 1:01:44 PM
Future Crimes by Marc Goodman
I think this is a great read for every IT Security professional. 
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