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Black Hat Asia
May 10-13, 2022
Hybrid/Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
Black Hat USA
August 6-11, 2022
Las Vegas, NV, USA
Black Hat Europe
December 5-8, 2022
London
1/20/2015
11:00 AM
Black Hat Staff
Black Hat Staff
Event Updates

Black Hat Asia 2015: One of Everything

Our fifth and final Black Hat Asia 2015 Training update brings word of a potpourri of hands-on topics. Between coding fuzzers, hacking software-defined radio, and assembling custom pentest gadgets, there's something here for everyone. Well, everyone who'd come to a Black Hat event, anyway.

So, fuzzers. Despite the best efforts -- extensive QA, bounty programs -- bugs continue to plague software, hardware, and technology in general, such that it's still possible to find zero-day vulnerabilities in production software with little more than a fuzzer. Developers and security researchers alike can learn the art of fuzzing at Fuzzing For Vulnerabilities. You'll learn the fundamental techniques, including mutation- and generative-based fuzzers, dumb and smart fuzzing, advanced techniques, and crash analysis. By the end of the course you'll know how to create the right fuzzer for the job -- the one that discovers the bugs.

Software-defined radio is a hot topic, and our popular Software Defined Radio Training will bring you up to speed on this brave new world of freeform radio with the help of a shiny new HackRF One SDR radio transceiver, yours to keep. Expect a broad-based introduction to digital signal processing, software radio, and the powerful tools that enable the growing array of SDR projects within the hacking community. You'll learn how to transmit, receive, and analyze radio signals and be prepared to use this knowledge in researching wireless security. (Cool radio voice optional.)

Finally, in loving memory of a time when Radio Shack was actually worth visiting, Make Your Own Pentesting Gadget will teach you how to do exactly that. (Hopefully you have room for one more?) Vivek Ramachandran's Training will show how to make a pentesting gadget from scratch using off-the-shelf wireless routers. It'll run pentest tools like Nmap, Metasploit, and Aircrack-NG, automate pentest tasks, create rogue devices and backdoor firmware, and even create a wireless IDS/IPS.

Have you booked your trip yet? You can still secure your Black Hat Asia 2015 attendance at early bird rates, but the deadline is this Friday, January 23. Time to make those plans!

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