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Attacks/Breaches

7/7/2017
12:50 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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NotPetya: How to Prep and Respond if You're Hit

Security pros share practices to prepare and handle advanced malware attacks like NotPetya.
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Respond: Stop the infection
Security teams should be able to isolate incidents as soon as possible before starting recovery, Sweet explains. Once malware hits one machine, it will start seeking other systems that have the same vulnerability and are open to infection.
'You need to put the fire out before you start recovering,' he says.
Most of these attacks have pretty well-defined signatures, Sweet continues. An internal firewall can be used to block the ports that systems use to infect one another. Once a worm is detected, security and business teams should work together to block the east-west spread of malware within the environment behind the firewall.
'Security teams need to drill for, and practice shutting down, lateral movement to prevent fast-moving worms or ransomware that uses self-propagating means of replication,' says Pierson, noting how this was seen in both WannaCry and Petya. Microsegmentation can be extremely effective in preventing this expansion, he adds.
(Image: Den Rise via Shutterstock)

Respond: Stop the infection

Security teams should be able to isolate incidents as soon as possible before starting recovery, Sweet explains. Once malware hits one machine, it will start seeking other systems that have the same vulnerability and are open to infection.

"You need to put the fire out before you start recovering," he says.

Most of these attacks have pretty well-defined signatures, Sweet continues. An internal firewall can be used to block the ports that systems use to infect one another. Once a worm is detected, security and business teams should work together to block the east-west spread of malware within the environment behind the firewall.

"Security teams need to drill for, and practice shutting down, lateral movement to prevent fast-moving worms or ransomware that uses self-propagating means of replication," says Pierson, noting how this was seen in both WannaCry and Petya. Microsegmentation can be extremely effective in preventing this expansion, he adds.

(Image: Den Rise via Shutterstock)

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RobEnns
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RobEnns,
User Rank: Author
7/13/2017 | 2:56:59 PM
Re: What about replicated COOP scenarios
Very good question, interested in the same.
matt.trevors
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matt.trevors,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/12/2017 | 12:13:55 PM
We need to stop confusing end users
We in the security community have a very difficult time conveying the importance of various strategies and tactics to end users when it comes to securing their infrastructure.  I believe it in part is because we aren't promoting a unified message. Instead, we tell them what we "think" are the right things to do.  Instead, why don't you preach about the adoption of existing well-documented strategies and tactics?  For instance, you could have pointed end users to the Center for Internet Security Critical Security Controls (formerly SANS 20) which would include standing up an incident response plan, patching boxes, and backing up high-value assets.  Also, you could have pointed people to NIST 800-61 Computer Security Incident Handling Guide which would give them a good idea of how to stand up incident response capabilities for their organization (planning, detection & analysis, containment, eradication, recovery, and post-incident activities).  Finally, you are dancing around the NIST Cybersecurity Framework which includes functions, categories, and subcategories that describe how to identify, protect, detect, respond, and recover.  

As a community, we need to get better at getting our message across or things are never going to get better.  To do that, we all need to get on the same page and back published standards.  If you don't agree with the standards, most encourage community feedback.
randyfromsd
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50%
randyfromsd,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/11/2017 | 4:23:26 PM
Re: What about replicated COOP scenarios
Isolate the backup target from the network - make shares hidden so they aren't easily accessible - restrict user accounts - implement local\offsite backup.
jenshadus
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jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2017 | 8:35:09 AM
What about replicated COOP scenarios
Just curious of how a malware attack would affect an active-active DR scenario.  If the malware can infect a primary target, I would think it would affect the backup environment.  And what would this do to the backup recovery plans?  Sounds like the best bet is to still use tape backup.
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