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11/19/2019
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NINJIO Introduces Security Awareness Training for SMBS

Company offers a subscription to animated micro-learning videos to help protect organizations with less than 100 employees from cyberattacks.

LOS ANGELES, CA (November 19, 2019)—As hackers become increasingly sinister and continue to target vulnerable subgroups, such as the elderly, young people, and small businesses who cannot necessarily afford full-time I.T. staff, cybersecurity awareness training company NINJIO has launched NINJIO SMB in order to attack the problem head-on. The industry-first solution makes NINJIO’s expansive library of Hollywood-style, animated micro-learning videos—currently used by some of the world’s largest companies—available through a month-to-month, subscription-based service.

According to Verizon’s 2019 Data Breach Investigations Report, 43 percent of cyberattacks target small-to-midsize businesses (SMBs). A recent survey by the U.S. Small Business Administration found that 88 percent of small business owners “felt their business was vulnerable to a cyberattack.” They’re right to be concerned: A report by the Better Business Bureau found that cyberattacks cost small businesses an average of almost $80,000 annually, and losses can range up to $1 million.

“93 percent of security breaches are caused by human error, and for small businesses these errors can literally cost them their livelihood,” remarked NINJIO founder and CEO, Zack Schuler. “After watching two friends nearly lose everything they’d worked for, one due to wire fraud and the other because of ransomware, I knew I had to do something. Developing an affordable, battle-tested solution geared toward smaller organizations—which may not otherwise have access to this necessary training—was the right move, and I believe it will prevent thousands of breaches in the future.”

The NINJIO SMB solution is aligned with the company’s commitment to helping organizations “take proactive steps to enhance cybersecurity at home and in the workplace,” a mandate also shared by the cybersecurity industry at large. Additionally, every organization that arms its employees with NINJIO’s Hollywood-style, micro-learning videos by purchasing NINJIO SMB, will also gain access to Friends and Family Use Rights for seven additional friends or family members.

Developed and co-produced by Hollywood writer and producer Bill Haynes, best known for CSI: NY and Hawaii Five-O, NINJIO SMB animated videos cover topic areas such as ransomware, business email compromise, and spearphishing. The solution is available as a month-to-month subscription, cancellable at any time.

About NINJIO

Los Angeles, California-based NINJIO is a cybersecurity awareness training company that empowers individuals and organizations to become defenders against cyberthreats. It was founded in July 2015 by I.T. services industry leader, Zack Schuler. Today, NINJIO creates 3 to 4 minute Hollywood-style micro-learning videos that teach organizations, employees, and families how not to get hacked. The company serves Fortune 500 companies and small businesses alike, and has changed the behavior of hundreds of thousands of people through engaging, emotionally-driven storytelling.

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