Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

7/10/2020
05:40 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

Mobile App Fraud Jumped in Q1 as Attackers Pivot from Browsers

RSA data reveals a continued shift away from browser-based fraud as attackers target mobile apps.

One of the most significant developments in online fraud for consumer-facing organizations last quarter was a sharp increase in fraudulent transactions originating from mobile applications instead of mobile browsers.

Though phishing dominated all other types of fraud, as it has for the past several years, a new analysis of cyberattack data by RSA's Fraud and Risk Intelligence team showed a dramatic shift in fraud activity within the mobile channel. Its analysis of global customer data, collected in the first quarter of 2020, showed a doubling in the volume of fraud transactions that originated in a mobile app rather than a mobile browser.

In the fourth quarter of 2019, 72% of fraud activity that RSA tracked involved the mobile channel. Of that number, 59% originated from a mobile browser and 13% from mobile apps. In the first quarter of 2020, mobile app-related fraud soared to 26% while fraud originating from mobile browsers fell by a corresponding 13%. This represents the highest percentage of fraud involving mobile apps in nearly two years and underscores a broader shift away from fraud involving Web browsers on PCs.

With the exception of the second and third quarters of 2019, RSA data showed the overall volume of fraud stemming from mobile channels, both mobile apps and mobile browsers, has been substantially greater than fraud originating from PC-based Web browsers since at least the first quarter of 2017.

"The volume of fraud from mobile devices has been increasing steadily over the past several years, moving over from PC-based traffic," says Daniel Cohen, head of anti-fraud products at RSA. Much of this is related to the increased use of mobile devices for everyday transactions over the past few years. In the first quarter of 2020, however, another factor was at play.

"Recently, with COVID-19 forcing us to do more things online that we once did physically, like grocery shopping, mobile transactions have become more prominent," Cohen says.

RSA's data tracks with that from other security vendors. Last month, Lookout reported an increase of more than 66% in mobile phishing encounters among corporate users in North America, and a nearly 37% increase globally. 

In the first quarter of 2020, RSA counted 50,119 attacks involving phishing, Trojan horse malware, rogue mobile apps, and brand abuse involving social media and online content to mislead users via brand impersonation. More than half of attacks involved phishing and 22% involved brand abuse, the second-highest form of fraud. Rogue mobile apps accounted for 15% of attack types that RSA counted, followed by Trojan malware at 9%.

Once again, Internet users in Canada were by far the most heavily targeted in phishing attacks. Sixty-six percent of phishing attacks that RSA counted were targeted at Canadian users. For two years in a row, and five straight quarters, Canada has been the biggest phishing target, according to RSA.

The United States, an equally consistent — but distant — second-place target, accounted for 7% of phishing attacks in RSA's data last quarter. Other countries with fairly big targets on their backs included Spain, India, and the Netherlands. When it came to countries hosting the highest number of phishing attacks, however, the US topped the list followed by China, Germany, India, and Russia.

Like numerous recent studies have shown, a high percentage of phishing activity in the first quarter of 2020 involved COVID-19 themed messages and lures. "While fraudsters always take advantage of disruptions, COVID-19 is currently the go-to tool for targeting end users," Cohen says. "As we continue through the pandemic, people will need to be extra cautious before they click on links. Otherwise, they're opening up themselves and potentially their businesses to new risks.”

Related Content:

Black Hat Register now for this year's fully virtual Black Hat USA, scheduled to take place August 1–6, and get more information about the event on the Black Hat website. Click for detail on conference information and to register.

Jai Vijayan is a seasoned technology reporter with over 20 years of experience in IT trade journalism. He was most recently a Senior Editor at Computerworld, where he covered information security and data privacy issues for the publication. Over the course of his 20-year ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Overcoming the Challenge of Shorter Certificate Lifespans
Mike Cooper, Founder & CEO of Revocent,  10/15/2020
7 Tips for Choosing Security Metrics That Matter
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer,  10/19/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-27605
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
BigBlueButton through 2.2.8 uses Ghostscript for processing of uploaded EPS documents, and consequently may be subject to attacks related to a "schwache Sandbox."
CVE-2020-27606
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
BigBlueButton before 2.2.8 (or earlier) does not set the secure flag for the session cookie in an https session, which makes it easier for remote attackers to capture this cookie by intercepting its transmission within an http session.
CVE-2020-27607
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
In BigBlueButton before 2.2.8 (or earlier), the client-side Mute button only signifies that the server should stop accepting audio data from the client. It does not directly configure the client to stop sending audio data to the server, and thus a modified server could store the audio data and/or tr...
CVE-2020-27608
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
In BigBlueButton before 2.2.8 (or earlier), uploaded presentations are sent to clients without a Content-Type header, which allows XSS, as demonstrated by a .png file extension for an HTML document.
CVE-2020-27609
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-21
BigBlueButton through 2.2.8 records a video meeting despite the deactivation of video recording in the user interface. This may result in data storage beyond what is authorized for a specific meeting topic or participant.