Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

6/26/2007
03:40 AM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Killing That 'Man in the Browser'

TriCipher to unveil transaction security tool today

TriCipher today will roll out a new security add-on aimed at protecting financial institutions and their customers from attacks targeting online transactions, Dark Reading has learned. The new Armored Transactions software verifies transactions to prevent phishing as well as the more dangerous man-in-the-browser attacks that intercept and manipulate transactions to steal money, identities, and launch other attacks. (See Authentication Goes USB Route.)

The new Armored Transactions add-on runs with TriCipher's Armored Credential System (TACS) 4.0, a multi-factor authentication package aimed mainly at financial institutions and healthcare organizations. Armored Transaction runs on the same screen as the browser, but separate from the browser, in its own SSL session. When an online banking customer submits $200 in a transaction, for instance, and a bad guy in the middle intercepts it and steers $500 to his account, the software catches the discrepancy and alerts the user before he confirms his transaction. "It will show a lie if there is one," says Tim Renshaw, vice president of evangelism and field applications for TriCipher.

Renshaw says the software doesn't focus on the actual vulnerabilities that the infected browsers suffer from, but more the malware that has infested them. "It's less worried about the technique being used, so the good news is this is not specific to a vulnerability. It solves the entire vector of attack types, regardless of whether it's ActiveX, Java, cross-site scripting, or other related attacks."

Armored Transaction uses the browser's SSL session, as well as TriCipher's PKI-based digital identification scheme behind the scenes, which is based on three keys. It also lets a user digitally "sign" a transaction. The tool is basically an alternative to challenge/response systems, and TriCipher says its early customers are financial institution customers doing high-dollar transactions, such as brokerages. "I don't see this being for every $100 utility bill."

Man-in-the browser attacks thus far haven't been as widespread in the U.S. as in Europe, however, since smart cards are still emerging here, Renshaw notes. The bad guys are increasingly choosing this method because it's too tough to jump in between an SSL session, he says.

TriCipher is still hammering out pricing details and structure, but Renshaw says it will likely come to somewhere under one dollar per user for large, 100,000-user deployments.

— Kelly Jackson Higgins, Senior Editor, Dark Reading

  • TriCipher Inc. Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

    Comment  | 
    Print  | 
    More Insights
  • Comments
    Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
    COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
    Dark Reading Staff 4/7/2020
    The Coronavirus & Cybersecurity: 3 Areas of Exploitation
    Robert R. Ackerman Jr., Founder & Managing Director, Allegis Capital,  4/7/2020
    Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
    White Papers
    Video
    Cartoon Contest
    Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
    Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
    Current Issue
    6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
    This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
    Flash Poll
    State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
    State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
    Data breaches and regulations have forced organizations to pay closer attention to the security incident response function. However, security leaders may be overestimating their ability to detect and respond to security incidents. Read this report to find out more.
    Twitter Feed
    Dark Reading - Bug Report
    Bug Report
    Enterprise Vulnerabilities
    From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
    CVE-2019-20637
    PUBLISHED: 2020-04-08
    An issue was discovered in Varnish Cache before 6.0.5 LTS, 6.1.x and 6.2.x before 6.2.2, and 6.3.x before 6.3.1. It does not clear a pointer between the handling of one client request and the next request within the same connection. This sometimes causes information to be disclosed from the connecti...
    CVE-2020-11650
    PUBLISHED: 2020-04-08
    An issue was discovered in iXsystems FreeNAS 11.2 and 11.3 before 11.3-U1. It allows a denial of service.
    CVE-2020-11653
    PUBLISHED: 2020-04-08
    An issue was discovered in Varnish Cache before 6.0.6 LTS, 6.1.x and 6.2.x before 6.2.3, and 6.3.x before 6.3.2. It occurs when communication with a TLS termination proxy uses PROXY version 2. There can be an assertion failure and daemon restart, which causes a performance loss.
    CVE-2020-2732
    PUBLISHED: 2020-04-08
    A flaw was discovered in the way that the KVM hypervisor handled instruction emulation for an L2 guest when nested virtualisation is enabled. Under some circumstances, an L2 guest may trick the L0 guest into accessing sensitive L1 resources that should be inaccessible to the L2 guest.
    CVE-2020-1627
    PUBLISHED: 2020-04-08
    A vulnerability in Juniper Networks Junos OS on vMX and MX150 devices may allow an attacker to cause a Denial of Service (DoS) by sending specific packets requiring special processing in microcode that the flow cache can't handle, causing the riot forwarding daemon to crash. By continuously sending ...