Attacks/Breaches

1/30/2019
06:45 PM
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Justice Dept. Alerting Victims of North Korean Botnet Infections

US officials disrupt North Korea's Joanap attack infrastructure.

The US Department of Justice today announced that it is notifying US victims whose computers are infected with malware used by North Korea to build out its massive Joanap botnet.

Joanap is a major attack infrastructure used by North Korea for cyberattack campaigns. The botnet is made up of Windows-based machines worldwide. 

"The search warrants and court orders announced today as part of our efforts to eradicate this botnet are just one of the many tools we will use to prevent cybercriminals from using botnets to stage damaging computer intrusions," said United States Attorney Nick Hanna.     

The search warrant gave the FBI and Air Force permission to sinkhole infected machines and map the botnet's scope. The FBI also is working with foreign governments to alert victims in their countries.

Read more here.

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/31/2019 | 10:16:41 AM
Civilian Honeynet
The government is kind of using this warrant to treat civlians like a high risk honeynet. It may provide them with the desired result but I feel that there may be some societal pushback.
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