Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

2/11/2021
12:45 PM
Jai Vijayan
Jai Vijayan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail

7 Things We Know So Far About the SolarWinds Attacks

Two months after the news first broke, many questions remain about the sophisticated cyber-espionage campaign.
5 of 8

A Who's-Who List of Victims
The actual number of organizations that were specifically targeted for attack remains unknown. SolarWinds itself has said some 18,000 organizations worldwide received the tainted Orion platform updates. But security vendors and others that have analyzed the attack have said the actual number of organizations that the adversaries were interested in for subsequent attack and exploitation is far less. Microsoft, for instance, said it found evidence that only about 40 of its customers that had downloaded the poisoned Orion updates were compromised through additional and more sophisticated measures.
According to lists compiled by TruSec, Prevasio, Netresec, and others, organizations that may have downloaded the poisoned SolarWinds Orion updates include Cisco, Deloitte, Intel, Nvidia, Belkin, Hasbro, Qualys, Microsoft, FireEye, Malwarebytes, Palo Alto Networks, and Cox Communications. In addition, several government agencies were impacted, including the departments of Commerce, Energy, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security. According to the FBI, CISA, and others, fewer than 10 agencies have experienced follow-up threat activity after the initial backdoor was deployed.
FireEye disclosed that the attack resulted in its red team tools being stolen. It's unclear how many others who downloaded the Orion updates experienced similar data theft and other consequences.
An analysis by Kaspersky of some 2,000 domains impacted by the Sunburst backdoor found that industrial organizations accounted for 32.4% of the victims, followed by manufacturing (18.11%), utilities (3.24%), construction (3.03%), and transportation and logistics (2.97%).
Image Source: wk1003mike via Shutterstock

A Who's-Who List of Victims

The actual number of organizations that were specifically targeted for attack remains unknown. SolarWinds itself has said some 18,000 organizations worldwide received the tainted Orion platform updates. But security vendors and others that have analyzed the attack have said the actual number of organizations that the adversaries were interested in for subsequent attack and exploitation is far less. Microsoft, for instance, said it found evidence that only about 40 of its customers that had downloaded the poisoned Orion updates were compromised through additional and more sophisticated measures.

According to lists compiled by TruSec, Prevasio, Netresec, and others, organizations that may have downloaded the poisoned SolarWinds Orion updates include Cisco, Deloitte, Intel, Nvidia, Belkin, Hasbro, Qualys, Microsoft, FireEye, Malwarebytes, Palo Alto Networks, and Cox Communications. In addition, several government agencies were impacted, including the departments of Commerce, Energy, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security. According to the FBI, CISA, and others, fewer than 10 agencies have experienced follow-up threat activity after the initial backdoor was deployed.

FireEye disclosed that the attack resulted in its red team tools being stolen. It's unclear how many others who downloaded the Orion updates experienced similar data theft and other consequences.

An analysis by Kaspersky of some 2,000 domains impacted by the Sunburst backdoor found that industrial organizations accounted for 32.4% of the victims, followed by manufacturing (18.11%), utilities (3.24%), construction (3.03%), and transportation and logistics (2.97%).

Image Source: wk1003mike via Shutterstock

5 of 8
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Enterprise Cybersecurity Plans in a Post-Pandemic World
Download the Enterprise Cybersecurity Plans in a Post-Pandemic World report to understand how security leaders are maintaining pace with pandemic-related challenges, and where there is room for improvement.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-41393
PUBLISHED: 2021-09-18
Teleport before 4.4.11, 5.x before 5.2.4, 6.x before 6.2.12, and 7.x before 7.1.1 allows forgery of SSH host certificates in some situations.
CVE-2021-41394
PUBLISHED: 2021-09-18
Teleport before 4.4.11, 5.x before 5.2.4, 6.x before 6.2.12, and 7.x before 7.1.1 allows alteration of build artifacts in some situations.
CVE-2021-41395
PUBLISHED: 2021-09-18
Teleport before 6.2.12 and 7.x before 7.1.1 allows attackers to control a database connection string, in some situations, via a crafted database name or username.
CVE-2021-3806
PUBLISHED: 2021-09-18
A path traversal vulnerability on Pardus Software Center's "extractArchive" function could allow anyone on the same network to do a man-in-the-middle and write files on the system.
CVE-2021-41392
PUBLISHED: 2021-09-17
static/main-preload.js in Boost Note through 0.22.0 allows remote command execution. A remote attacker may send a crafted IPC message to the exposed vulnerable ipcRenderer IPC interface, which invokes the dangerous openExternal Electron API.