Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

10/18/2016
04:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

7 Regional Hotbeds For Cybersecurity Innovation

These regions are driving cybersecurity innovation across the US with an abundance of tech talent, educational institutions, accelerators, incubators, and startup activity.
Previous
1 of 8
Next

As cybersecurity becomes more of an imperative for individuals and organizations, several regions in the US are investing money and efforts in security innovation.

Silicon Valley may be the most famous hotspot for tech innovation in the country, but it's far from the only place driving cybersecurity advancement. Areas such as the Washington, DC region and the Boston metro area are home to a growing number of security startups and incubators.

There are several factors that contribute to making an area a hotbed for security innovation, explains Rick Gordon, managing partner at cybersecurity startup accelerator Mach37. Some critical elements include availability of seed capital and educational institutions generating new talent.

"Cyber is an area where innovation is built and based on extent of experience and knowledge," says Bob Ackerman, founder of cybersecurity venture capital firm Allegis Capital. The technology is deep, and the ability to develop and apply it requires a lot of experience.

The problem is, the industry is struggling with a shortage of skilled security engineers, he continues. Regions are trying to fill the gap by building programs to graduate more skilled graduates and using technology to increase the productivity of existing engineers.

Many colleges and universities have begun to respond to the shortage in engineering talent by expanding their curricula to include cybersecurity. UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, and Georgia Tech are among institutions fueling tech innovation with trained graduates.

Even in regions known for technological innovation, it can be difficult for security startups to succeed because they need more than tech talent to achieve growth. Oftentimes, tech talent moves to areas where business expertise and a strong venture capital ecosystem will support innovation.

For this reason, security businesses have begun to emerge in regions where they have access to capital, skills, and opportunities needed to grow. These regions are primarily located on the east and west coasts of the US, but some have begun to pop up in the south and the middle of the country.

"Cybersecurity is an area driven by nonstop innovation," explains Ackerman. "The half-life of cybersecurity is one of the shortest in IT. We focus on these regions because in cybersecurity, if you're going to compete, you have to have a solid foundation to start. You can't pick it up as you go."

Here, we spotlight some regions across the US driving innovation in the cybersecurity space through factors like education, accelerators, and other support for entrepreneurs and startups looking to grow.

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 8
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
futon45
50%
50%
futon45,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/20/2016 | 8:13:07 AM
futon mattress
Excellent blog

10 Ways to Keep a Rogue RasPi From Wrecking Your Network
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  7/10/2019
The Security of Cloud Applications
Hillel Solow, CTO and Co-founder, Protego,  7/11/2019
Where Businesses Waste Endpoint Security Budgets
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/15/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: "Jim, stop pretending you're drowning in tickets."
Current Issue
Building and Managing an IT Security Operations Program
As cyber threats grow, many organizations are building security operations centers (SOCs) to improve their defenses. In this Tech Digest you will learn tips on how to get the most out of a SOC in your organization - and what to do if you can't afford to build one.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-13623
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-17
In NSA Ghidra through 9.0.4, path traversal can occur in RestoreTask.java (from the package ghidra.app.plugin.core.archive) via an archive with an executable file that has an initial ../ in its filename. This allows attackers to overwrite arbitrary files in scenarios where an intermediate analysis r...
CVE-2019-13624
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-17
In ONOS 1.15.0, apps/yang/web/src/main/java/org/onosproject/yang/web/YangWebResource.java mishandles backquote characters within strings that can be used in a shell command.
CVE-2019-13625
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-17
NSA Ghidra before 9.0.1 allows XXE when a project is opened or restored, or a tool is imported, as demonstrated by a project.prp file.
CVE-2019-3571
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-16
An input validation issue affected WhatsApp Desktop versions prior to 0.3.3793 which allows malicious clients to send files to users that would be displayed with a wrong extension.
CVE-2019-6160
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-16
A vulnerability in various versions of Iomega and LenovoEMC NAS products could allow an unauthenticated user to access files on NAS shares via the API.