Attacks/Breaches

2/21/2018
10:14 AM
Jai Vijayan
Jai Vijayan
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7 Cryptominers & Cryptomining Botnets You Can't Ignore

Cryptominers have emerged as a major threat to organizations worldwide. Here are seven you cannot afford to ignore.
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Coinhive
Coinhive is a cryptocurrency miner deployed on thousands of websites around the world - some with the knowledge and permission of the site owners, but often without their knowledge. It is designed to mine for the Monero cryptocurrency by surreptitiously hijacking the computing resources of the systems being used by visitors to these sites.
Coinhive by itself is not malicious. In fact, Coinhive.com has been making the miner available to website owners so they can run it in the browsers of users to their sites and make some Monero in return for giving users an ad-free experience. But multiple security vendors have begun blocking Coinhive because many site owners have been running the miner without informing users about it.
Cybercriminals too have been indiscriminately embedding the miner on thousands of websites without the knowledge of the site owners. Check Point Software Technologies has estimated that in January 2018 a staggering 23% of organizations worldwide were impacted by Coinhive.
Coinhive's in-browser JavaScript mining code was also secretly loaded into 19 Android apps sold on the Google Play store. One was installed on 100,000 to 500,000 devices, says Taylor Armerding, senior security strategist at Synopsys.
'RiskIQ crawling data found upwards of 50,000 websites with Coinhive either embedded directly into them or injected via a compromised third-party component, such as Texthelp, in the past year,' says Vamsi Gullapalli, product manager at RiskIQ, citing recent data. Many of them were likely embedded without the original owner's knowledge, he says.

Image Source: JK21 via Shutterstock

Coinhive

Coinhive is a cryptocurrency miner deployed on thousands of websites around the world - some with the knowledge and permission of the site owners, but often without their knowledge. It is designed to mine for the Monero cryptocurrency by surreptitiously hijacking the computing resources of the systems being used by visitors to these sites.

Coinhive by itself is not malicious. In fact, Coinhive.com has been making the miner available to website owners so they can run it in the browsers of users to their sites and make some Monero in return for giving users an ad-free experience. But multiple security vendors have begun blocking Coinhive because many site owners have been running the miner without informing users about it.

Cybercriminals too have been indiscriminately embedding the miner on thousands of websites without the knowledge of the site owners. Check Point Software Technologies has estimated that in January 2018 a staggering 23% of organizations worldwide were impacted by Coinhive.

Coinhive's in-browser JavaScript mining code was also secretly loaded into 19 Android apps sold on the Google Play store. One was installed on 100,000 to 500,000 devices, says Taylor Armerding, senior security strategist at Synopsys.

"RiskIQ crawling data found upwards of 50,000 websites with Coinhive either embedded directly into them or injected via a compromised third-party component, such as Texthelp, in the past year," says Vamsi Gullapalli, product manager at RiskIQ, citing recent data. Many of them were likely embedded without the original owners knowledge, he says.

Image Source: JK21 via Shutterstock

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/27/2018 | 7:48:20 PM
Mining Resources-Not Surprised
As someone who mines as a hobby I am not surprised. Resources to generate sustainable profit require heavy resources. GPU rigs, that are inflating the prices of dedicated GPU's, mine those hash values somewhat slowly. Utilizing botnets you can maximize your resources even if the targeted hosts have sub-optimal specificiations. Also, since the price of BTC is above 10K currently utilizing the malicious method can be effective from a mining perspective, though deplorable from an ethics perspective. But something tells me those individuals do not care too much in that regard.
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