Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

7/22/2011
08:48 AM
50%
50%

How To Respond To A Denial Of Service Attack

You can't prevent an overwhelming DDoS attack, but you can minimize its impact. Here's how.

Denial of service (DoS)--particularly distributed denial of service (DDoS)--attacks have hit many enterprises recently, from Sony to Bank of America.

For years, most companies wrote off DoS attacks as an acceptable risk, because the probability of becoming a victim was relatively low and the risk of damage to the business was also low. Recently, however, this class of attack has increased in popularity, causing many organizations to rethink the relative risk. CEO's are concerned about lost revenue and bad press; IT frets over crashed applications and long work hours.

While you can't prevent all DDoS attacks, there are options to limit their effectiveness and allow your organization to recover faster. Most of the recent attacks have targeted Web applications--they simply send more requests than the targeted Web application can handle, making it difficult for visitors to use.

In such attacks, most attackers aren't concerned about whether the system and application actually crashes, though they would be happy if a crash occurs. Their main goal is to prevent services offered by the targeted company from responding to requests from legitimate users, causing problems for the victim company.

If you have the proper monitoring technology, these attacks are easy to spot. Your network operations center (NOC) will be at status quo--bandwidth, requests per second, and system resource usage will all trend normally. Then, either suddenly or over a small amount of time, all of these trends will shoot upwards, thresholds will be reached, and alerts will be sent by the monitoring system.

In a typical organization, these events will trigger an escalation at the NOC, and the IT team will rush to get the right people involved. Management will receive notice that sites and applications are responding unusually, and all will be wondering why there is such a huge increase in requests in such a short period time.

Unless your site was just mentioned in on the front page of Slashdot, then most likely you're experiencing the start of a DDoS. Congratulations! You're now part of a club of organizations that have been targeted for a DDoS attack--usually because the attackers don't like your corporate policies, or because they were paid to attack you.

The first step is to analyze the logs for requests.

Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

Security concerns give many companies pause as they consider migrating portions of their IT operations to cloud-based services. But you can stay safe in the cloud. In this Dark Reading Tech Center report, we explain the risks and guide you in setting appropriate cloud security policies, processes and controls. Read our report now. (Free registration required.)

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
SOC 2s & Third-Party Assessments: How to Prevent Them from Being Used in a Data Breach Lawsuit
Beth Burgin Waller, Chair, Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Practice , Woods Rogers PLC,  12/5/2019
Navigating Security in the Cloud
Diya Jolly, Chief Product Officer, Okta,  12/4/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: "This is the last time we hire Game of Thrones Security"
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-19230
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
An unsafe deserialization vulnerability exists in CA Release Automation (Nolio) 6.6 with the DataManagement component that can allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code.
CVE-2013-0342
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
The CreateID function in packet.py in pyrad before 2.1 uses sequential packet IDs, which makes it easier for remote attackers to spoof packets by predicting the next ID, a different vulnerability than CVE-2013-0294.
CVE-2014-0242
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
mod_wsgi module before 3.4 for Apache, when used in embedded mode, might allow remote attackers to obtain sensitive information via the Content-Type header which is generated from memory that may have been freed and then overwritten by a separate thread.
CVE-2015-3424
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
SQL injection vulnerability in Accentis Content Resource Management System before the October 2015 patch allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the SIDX parameter.
CVE-2015-3425
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Accentis Content Resource Management System before October 2015 patch allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the ctl00$cph_content$_uig_formState parameter.