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Research Team Demonstrates Perfect Secrecy ImplementationResearch Team Demonstrates Perfect Secrecy Implementation

The technique is notable because it can be implemented using low-cost, standard hardware components.

Dark Reading Staff

December 20, 2019

1 Min Read

A team of researchers has published a paper showing "perfect secrecy cryptography" on a chip. The technique, the researchers say, is resistant to even quantum computer exploitation because it uses correlated chaotic wavepackets, which are mixed in inexpensive silicon chips.

The research paper, published in the journal Nature, says the second law of thermodynamics and the exponential sensitivity of chaos unconditionally protect this scheme.

"Perfect secrecy" is the term for a concept patented by Gilbert Vernam in 1919 and proved by Claude Shannon to be unbreakable (when properly implemented). The three main properties of perfect secrecy are a message is encrypted by a bitwise XOR operation using a random key that is as long as the text to be transmitted, it is never reused in whole or in part, and it is kept secret.

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Dark Reading Staff

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