Security researchers found/punched a new hole in one of VMware's products this week, and from some quarters, it's being written about as if virtual machinery had never been a target for malicious code before. Those in the data center know differently.

1 Min Read

Security researchers found/punched a new hole in one of VMware's products this week, and from some quarters, it's being written about as if virtual machinery had never been a target for malicious code before. Those in the data center know differently.In fact, more than two years ago, VMware got hit with a vulnerability that cut clear across its major product lines, affecting its Workstation, GSX Server, ACE, and VMware Player products. The vendor deemed that software flaw "very serious." There have been other vulnerabilities since then.

This latest bug is in Windows host systems that run VMware Workstation, Player, and ACE software and should be patched in a couple weeks, according to this account. Otherwise, VMware was off in Cannes, unveiling an embedded hypervisor with HP.

Ivan Arce, CTO of Arce Security, which discovered the flaw, said there's a tendency to think that, just because virtualization provides isolation from the underlying OS, users are somehow less vulnerable to software security issues. Hard to believe any user might be lulled into that false sense of security, but many of us have learned the hard way how powerful and insidious denial can be.

Virtualization users looking for security options might start with the hundreds of options available here. Resellers and similarly positioned customers will have plenty of ideas, too.

Given the popularity of server virtualization and VMware's dominance of the market, there can only be more of these kinds of software vulnerabilities ahead.

Read more about:

2008

About the Author(s)

Terry Sweeney, Contributing Editor

Terry Sweeney is a Los Angeles-based writer and editor who has covered technology, networking, and security for more than 20 years. He was part of the team that started Dark Reading and has been a contributor to The Washington Post, Crain's New York Business, Red Herring, Network World, InformationWeek and Mobile Sports Report.

In addition to information security, Sweeney has written extensively about cloud computing, wireless technologies, storage networking, and analytics. After watching successive waves of technological advancement, he still prefers to chronicle the actual application of these breakthroughs by businesses and public sector organizations.


Keep up with the latest cybersecurity threats, newly discovered vulnerabilities, data breach information, and emerging trends. Delivered daily or weekly right to your email inbox.

You May Also Like


More Insights