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6/18/2018
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7 Ways Cybercriminals Are Scamming a Fortune from Cryptocurrencies

Cryptocurrencies, how do hackers love thee? Let us count the ways.
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Wallet Stealers
Since late last year, security researchers have been following an uptick in criminal scanning for insecure crypto wallets on the Internet. 
'It is important to have a basic understanding of how crypto transactions work to protect assets. It might help to imagine your crypto wallet as a safety deposit box that exists in a room with everyone else's deposit boxes,' explains James Lerud, head of the Behavioral Research Team at Verodin. 'It is a public room where anyone can put an asset into your safety deposit box so long as they know where it is. The only way to take money out of the box is to have a key. How you store that key, or who you trust to store that key for you, is the most important decision an investor can make to safeguard the assets within the deposit box.'
The methods of wallet pick pocketing continue to get creative, but they often follow some tried-and-true cybercriminal playbooks. For example, in April, Zscaler reported a surge in a remote access Trojan (RAT) called njRAT that was used not only as a ransomware tool, but also as a Bitcoing wallet stealer. Another piece of malware called ComboJack, first identified by Palo Alto Networks researchers, stole crypto wallet addresses from owners' clipboards, as many of them copy and paste them during transactions because of the long length of the addresses.
Image Source: Adobe Stock (davidevison)

Wallet Stealers

Since late last year, security researchers have been following an uptick in criminal scanning for insecure crypto wallets on the Internet.

"It is important to have a basic understanding of how crypto transactions work to protect assets. It might help to imagine your crypto wallet as a safety deposit box that exists in a room with everyone else's deposit boxes," explains James Lerud, head of the Behavioral Research Team at Verodin. "It is a public room where anyone can put an asset into your safety deposit box so long as they know where it is. The only way to take money out of the box is to have a key. How you store that key, or who you trust to store that key for you, is the most important decision an investor can make to safeguard the assets within the deposit box."

The methods of wallet pick pocketing continue to get creative, but they often follow some tried-and-true cybercriminal playbooks. For example, in April, Zscaler reported a surge in a remote access Trojan (RAT) called njRAT that was used not only as a ransomware tool, but also as a Bitcoing wallet stealer. Another piece of malware called ComboJack, first identified by Palo Alto Networks researchers, stole crypto wallet addresses from owners' clipboards, as many of them copy and paste them during transactions because of the long length of the addresses.

Image Source: Adobe Stock (davidevison)

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