Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

News

9/11/2017
12:30 PM
Jai Vijayan
Jai Vijayan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail

7 Takeaways From The Equifax Data Breach

The exposure of PII belonging to 143 million US consumers raises questions about the continued use of SSNs as identifiers, breach liability and app sec spending.
6 of 8

For Criminals, Personal Data Is Often Cheaper Than Credit Card Data

The use of stolen personally identifiable information (PII) such as SSNs, birth dates and driver's license data in identify theft and impersonation fraud can be very costly for victims of breaches, like the one at Equifax. In the underground market though, dossiers that contain full sets of PII on individuals - or 'Fullz' as they are referred to - currently are cheaper to buy than certain categories of credit card data, according to research from Secureworks.

Depending on factors like who's selling, the victim's country, and additional information like a full passport scan of the victim, a Fullz record can fetch maybe around $10. That's in contrast to the nearly $20 per card that credit and debit cards with high balances can garner on the Dark Web, Secureworks' research showed.

One reason why PII records are cheaper - though they hold a potentially much bigger upside from a crook's standpoint - is probably because identify and impersonation fraud are harder to pull of than credit card fraud.

(Image Source: Happy Stock Photo via Shutterstock)

For Criminals, Personal Data Is Often Cheaper Than Credit Card Data

The use of stolen personally identifiable information (PII) such as SSNs, birth dates and driver's license data in identify theft and impersonation fraud can be very costly for victims of breaches, like the one at Equifax. In the underground market though, dossiers that contain full sets of PII on individuals - or 'Fullz' as they are referred to - currently are cheaper to buy than certain categories of credit card data, according to research from Secureworks.

Depending on factors like who's selling, the victim's country, and additional information like a full passport scan of the victim, a Fullz record can fetch maybe around $10. That's in contrast to the nearly $20 per card that credit and debit cards with high balances can garner on the Dark Web, Secureworks' research showed.

One reason why PII records are cheaper - though they hold a potentially much bigger upside from a crook's standpoint - is probably because identify and impersonation fraud are harder to pull of than credit card fraud.

(Image Source: Happy Stock Photo via Shutterstock)

6 of 8
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
mrgorle@yahoo.com
50%
50%
[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
9/13/2017 | 9:34:21 AM
Excellent and well written article
Excellent Article Jay.  content and quality of the material is worth spending time eventhough 8 times clicking the clicking the arrow....
lunny
50%
50%
lunny,
User Rank: Strategist
9/20/2017 | 11:55:04 AM
Simplify the Mess
The app vulnerability was just the ingress point.  There are many open windows and unlocked doors that allowed the intruders to move about laterally and vertically throughout the environment.  We'll know more details eventually, as the litigation is sure to push much of the story into the public record.  The intruders got in, hid, obtained privileged credentials, and subsequently enjoyed free reign.  It wasn't hard.

We've got to stop treating servers like pets.  They are cattle.  They should all be standardized and we should build them all at the touch of a button from a single image that is fully patched.  You should be able to do this at any time and in just a few minutes.  It's called orchestration.  We're using orchestration to push out new code, but we are too timid to use it to bake security into the mix.  Despite all of the virtualization and cloud implementatinos, we're still patching servers as if they were all special and physical.  This is insane!  This is why companies cannot realistically patch all of their servers.  They are afraid it will be hard, complex, and things will break.  They're right.  Because every systems administrator, application owner, IT executive, business executive thinks their systems are special.  Well-designed network segmentation and a strong privileged access management regime is critical.

Equifax was simply whistling past the graveyard.  What will be written on their tombstone now?
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/20/2017 | 1:11:19 PM
New Discoveries
Perhaps I am a broken record, but I am amazed at the NEW IT SECURITY PROTOCOL discoveries that are made after every epic event - Delta, Merck, Equifax.  Such concepts are stunning - wow, like nobody thought of education for your user base (email basics) ----- power backup batteries in the bottom of a 42U server rack and a generator farm outside if needed ..... having on and offsite backups that are tested ---  patching applications and patching operating systems.  And always the management view that IT is just JUST an expense line item, so fire all the techs who know something and farm it all out to outsourcing firms that ONLY care about THEIR INVOICING.  Incredible how we shoot ourselves in the feet every single time. 
Why Cyber-Risk Is a C-Suite Issue
Marc Wilczek, Digital Strategist & CIO Advisor,  11/12/2019
The Cold Truth about Cyber Insurance
Chris Kennedy, CISO & VP Customer Success, AttackIQ,  11/7/2019
Black Hat Q&A: Hacking a '90s Sports Car
Black Hat Staff, ,  11/7/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-5230
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-13
P20 Pro, P20, Mate RS smartphones with versions earlier than Charlotte-AL00A 9.1.0.321(C00E320R1P1T8), versions earlier than Emily-AL00A 9.1.0.321(C00E320R1P1T8), versions earlier than NEO-AL00D NEO-AL00 9.1.0.321(C786E320R1P1T8) have an improper validation vulnerability. The system does not perform...
CVE-2019-5231
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-13
P30 smartphones with versions earlier than ELLE-AL00B 9.1.0.186(C00E180R2P1) have an improper authorization vulnerability. The software incorrectly performs an authorization check when a user attempts to perform certain action. Successful exploit could allow the attacker to update a crafted package.
CVE-2019-5233
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-13
Huawei smartphones with versions earlier than Taurus-AL00B 10.0.0.41(SP2C00E41R3P2) have an improper authentication vulnerability. Successful exploitation may cause the attacker to access specific components.
CVE-2019-5246
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-13
Smartphones with software of ELLE-AL00B 9.1.0.109(C00E106R1P21), 9.1.0.113(C00E110R1P21), 9.1.0.125(C00E120R1P21), 9.1.0.135(C00E130R1P21), 9.1.0.153(C00E150R1P21), 9.1.0.155(C00E150R1P21), 9.1.0.162(C00E160R2P1) have an insufficient verification vulnerability. The system does not verify certain par...
CVE-2010-4177
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-12
mysql-gui-tools (mysql-query-browser and mysql-admin) before 5.0r14+openSUSE-2.3 exposes the password of a user connected to the MySQL server in clear text form via the list of running processes.