Vulnerabilities / Threats
4/4/2011
11:00 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Web Applications See Sharp Rise In Attacks

Prepackaged exploits are helping attackers compromise more sites at once, while many content management systems are running with known vulnerabilities, finds report from HP DVLabs.

10 Massive Security Breaches
(click image for larger view)
Slideshow: 10 Massive Security Breaches
Nearly half of all software vulnerabilities found today involve Web applications -- a statistic that has remained relatively unchanged since 2006. Yet the percentage of attacks that exploit Web applications continues to increase.

That's according to HP Digital Vaccine Labs' (DVLabs) 2010 Top Cyber Security Risks Report, released Monday.

The sharp increase in attack volume -- especially against Web applications -- is due to the ready availability of botnet-based attack toolkits, many of which exploit known vulnerabilities, to automatically infect PCs and steal sensitive financial information from consumers.

"There's a growing market of underground, mafia-type organizations that develop and maintain toolkits for helping criminals compromise and monetize victims," said Mike Dausin, manager of advanced security intelligence for HP DVLabs, in an interview.

Many attack toolkits retail on the black market for just $3,000 to $4,000, which an enterprising attacker can quickly recoup. Furthermore, the latest toolkits come with an array of features, such as the ability to install code on websites that infects visiting browsers via known vulnerabilities. Other toolkit software infects PCs with code that removes competing botnet code that may already be present.

Better, more automated scripts are likewise helping attackers compromise websites and PCs more quickly. "We're seeing specialized scripts that you can load onto a host after you've compromised it that will use the host to launch further attacks, and that script may only be 100 Kbytes in length," said Dausin.

Another interesting trend called out by the HP DVLabs report was the change in vulnerabilities relating to popular, open source content management systems (CMS), such as WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal. "From 2006 to 2009-ish, the majority of vulnerabilities found in these content management systems were in the core product itself," said Dausin.

Owing to bad press over application vulnerabilities, however, he said many of the applications' developers have heavily refined their code. But the plug-ins for the applications haven't received the same level of scrutiny. As a result, whereas 60% of CMS vulnerabilities used to be in the core application, today it's closer to 50%, with plug-ins making up the rest. For Joomla and Drupal, about 95% of all vulnerabilities involve plug-ins, while for WordPress, it's about 80%.

But how secure are CMS applications running in the wild? "We tried to create a detection mechanism against these CMSes on the internet to see if they were vulnerable or running an un-patched version of the software or a plug-in," said Dausin. "We found that WordPress is generally quite secure, whereas almost all Joomla instances are vulnerable or at least running an un-patched version, as are Drupal instances."

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-3409
Published: 2014-10-25
The Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) handling feature in Cisco IOS 12.2(33)SRE9a and earlier and IOS XE 3.13S and earlier allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) via malformed CFM packets, aka Bug ID CSCuq93406.

CVE-2014-4620
Published: 2014-10-25
The EMC NetWorker Module for MEDITECH (aka NMMEDI) 3.0 build 87 through 90, when EMC RecoverPoint and Plink are used, stores cleartext RecoverPoint Appliance credentials in nsrmedisv.raw log files, which allows local users to obtain sensitive information by reading these files.

CVE-2014-4623
Published: 2014-10-25
EMC Avamar 6.0.x, 6.1.x, and 7.0.x in Avamar Data Store (ADS) GEN4(S) and Avamar Virtual Edition (AVE), when Password Hardening before 2.0.0.4 is enabled, uses UNIX DES crypt for password hashing, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to obtain cleartext passwords via a brute-force a...

CVE-2014-4624
Published: 2014-10-25
EMC Avamar Data Store (ADS) and Avamar Virtual Edition (AVE) 6.x and 7.0.x through 7.0.2-43 do not require authentication for Java API calls, which allows remote attackers to discover grid MCUser and GSAN passwords via a crafted call.

CVE-2014-6151
Published: 2014-10-25
CRLF injection vulnerability in IBM Tivoli Integrated Portal (TIP) 2.2.x allows remote authenticated users to inject arbitrary HTTP headers and conduct HTTP response splitting attacks via unspecified vectors.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.