Vulnerabilities / Threats
10/26/2009
06:07 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Top 10 E-mail Blunders Of 2009, So Far

Proofpoint's list of the ten biggest e-mail gaffes this year shows that organizations have yet to deal with the risks of e-mail.

E-mail, the Internet's first killer app, can injure companies and individuals when not used with care.

In its attempt to document the risks of electronic messaging and to make the case for the value of its services, Proofpoint, an e-mail security company, has assembled a list of what it considers are the "Top 10 Terrifying E-mail Blunders of 2009."

Keith Crosley, director of market development at Proofpoint, says the incidents his company has cited demonstrate the ongoing need for user training, for corporate e-mail policies, and for technology to enforce corporate policies. He says that only about a third of enterprises have deployed systems that can identify and block the unauthorized transmission of health or financial data.

The incidents that follow are, according to Proofpoint, in no particular order.

E-mail That Empties Bank Accounts: In September, the URLZone Trojan was reported to be spreading through e-mail and compromised Web sites, and emptying victims' bank accounts. It's even sophisticated enough to create forged balance reports to conceal its looting.

"No More Internet Banking For You!": That's what FBI director Robert Mueller's wife told him after the agency head clicked on a phishing message and nearly surrendered his personal information to a phishing Web site.

White House Spam: A White House effort to set the record straight about its healthcare plans in August led to the sending of unsolicited e-mail. The incident wasn't exactly a disaster. But it was it great public relations either.

Hotmail Accounts Blocked: Earlier this month, Microsoft blocked tens of thousands of Hotmail accounts that the company believed had been compromised as a result of a phishing scam. A security researcher at ScanSafe subsequently argued that exposed account credentials were gathered using a data theft trojan rather than a phishing attack.

Department Of Gaffes: Social media start-up RockYou reportedly managed to mess up its e-mail messaging three times in the past year. In January, it sent a mailing list message using the CC address field rather than BCC, exposing the e-mail addresses of everyone on the list. In November, it reportedly asked contractors for W-8/W-9 information in a message sent to a mailing list, which prompted replies containing personal information to the e-mail list rather than to the company's accounting department. And in September 2008, RockYou reportedly revealed over 200 e-mail addresses in a message it sent out.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: "Why else would HR ask me if I have a handicap?"
Current Issue
The Changing Face of Identity Management
Mobility and cloud services are altering the concept of user identity. Here are some ways to keep up.
Flash Poll
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio

The cybersecurity profession struggles to retain women (figures range from 10 to 20 percent). It's particularly worrisome for an industry with a rapidly growing number of vacant positions.

So why does the shortage of women continue to be worse in security than in other IT sectors? How can men in infosec be better allies for women; and how can women be better allies for one another? What is the industry doing to fix the problem -- what's working, and what isn't?

Is this really a problem at all? Are the low numbers simply an indication that women do not want to be in cybersecurity, and is it possible that more women will never want to be in cybersecurity? How many women would we need to see in the industry to declare success?

Join Dark Reading senior editor Sara Peters and guests Angela Knox of Cloudmark, Barrett Sellers of Arbor Networks, Regina Wallace-Jones of Facebook, Steve Christey Coley of MITRE, and Chris Roosenraad of M3AAWG on Wednesday, July 13 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time to discuss all this and more.