Vulnerabilities / Threats
10/21/2011
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The Three Most Frequently Attacked Mobile Devices

Android devices, tablets, and jailbroken devices top list of riskiest mobile products in the enterprise setting.

10 Companies Driving Mobile Security
10 Companies Driving Mobile Security
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
As mobile devices continue to become more sophisticated and more integral to employees' everyday work lives, these mini computers in our pockets and handbags continue to become bigger and bigger threats to IT security.

"The proliferation of the devices is happening so fast, and people are now pushing the limits on what they're using the devices for, that IT is having a hard time keeping up," says Dave Hansen, CEO of Numara Software.

So many devices are big risks because critical information runs freely through them and security procedures are ignored for the sake of expediency--these are tools built for convenience, after all. Most troubling, it is often the executive suite that champions fewer security controls so they can continue to use these mobile tools without fetters. That leads to an almost willful ignorance from IT, who would rather not butt heads with senior management.

"It's bizarre. I was a CIO for a Fortune 500 company, and I remember five years ago when I was the one that put passwords on BlackBerrys and thought they were going to burn effigies of me in the lobby," Hansen says. "There was yelling and debating going on at the executive level as to why we would to that."

But ignorance gets us nowhere. In order to mitigate the risks, IT first needs to identify them. The following three devices are some of the biggest security threats to your infrastructure, whether you know it or not.

Android Devices
Devices running on Android OS are increasingly becoming a favorite among hackers for two big reasons: market share and openness.

As the number of Android devices has proliferated in the market, it becomes an ideal medium for attackers to look for common vulnerabilities and quickly spread malware.

Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

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