Vulnerabilities / Threats
1/26/2012
09:45 AM
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Symantec: Users Should Disable PCAnywhere Now

Symantec moves into damage-control mode after LulzSec leader tweets the remote-access software may be used to launch exploits.

Stop using pcAnywhere.

The recommendation that users disable or delete the software is the takeaway from a surprise security advisory issued by Symantec late Tuesday, which warns customers to "only use pcAnywhere for business-critical purposes," and even then, only after configuring the software "in a way that minimizes potential risks."

Those risks stem from the theft of Symantec source code in 2006. The worry is that attackers, after studying the code, may have found a way to crack pcAnywhere's encryption, which would allow them to use the remote-access software to remotely access any PC on which it's active. That, in turn, might give attackers access to data stored on corporate networks.

Those revelations will no doubt lead to sharp questions for information security vendor Symantec, especially given the fact that five years' time elapsed between the source code theft, and Symantec publicly confirming the breach. Indeed, the data exposure only came to light after the hacking group Lords of Dharmaraja earlier this month posted to Pastebin what it said was part of the source code for Symantec's Norton Utilities (NU).

[ Consider another potential security hole in your enterprise: Videoconferencing Systems Vulnerable To Hackers. ]

Symantec at first dismissed that claim, but on January 16, former LulzSec leader Sabu announced via Twitter: "Lords of Dharmaraja has sent #antisec Symantec source codes for 0day-plundering. All your NU+PCAnywhere base are belong to us. Release soon."

Since then, Symantec has switched into damage-control mode, and begun detailing the results of its internal investigation into the source theft, which remains ongoing. "There are no indications that customer information has been impacted or exposed at this time," according to Symantec's security bulletin.

Who's at risk? According to Symantec's security advisory, "all pcAnywhere 12.0, 12.1, and 12.5 customers are at increased risk, as well as customers using prior versions of the product." The remote-access software runs on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and the PocketPC platform.

Symantec's pcAnywhere has also been bundled with numerous other products, both from Symantec as well as Altiris, which Symantec acquired in 2007. In addition, said Symantec, "a remote access component of pcAnywhere, called the pcAnywhere Thin Host, is also bundled with a number of Symantec backup and security products."

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