Vulnerabilities / Threats
2/28/2013
10:16 AM
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Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013

The Anonymous hacker group continues to seek equal measures of revenge, justice and reform -- preferably through chaotic means -- for perceived wrongdoings.
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In reaction to President Obama's recent executive order on cybersecurity and the reintroduction of CISPA legislation, Anonymous promised to interrupt Obama's State of the Union address.

"Anonymous has reached a verdict of no confidence in this executive order and the plans to reintroduce the CISPA bill to Congress on the same day," said a statement released by the group. "As such, President Obama and the State of the Union Address will be banished from the Internet for the duration of live delivery."

But as noted by IEEE's Spectrum, the group failed to disrupt the Internet stream of the President's State of the Union address.

Photograph courtesy of Flickr user Frederic Bisson.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Anonymous Plays Games With U.S. Sites

Hacking, Privacy Laws: Time To Reboot

Anonymous Claims Wall Street Data Dump

Anonymous Takes On State Department, More Banks

Anonymous Says DDoS Attacks Like Free Speech

U.S. Bank Hack Attack Techniques Identified

Bank Attacker Iran Ties Questioned By Security Pros

Anonymous DDoS Attackers In Britain Sentenced

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EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:38:40 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
eslamp 248
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:38:29 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
top covere pix
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:38:11 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
my friends
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:36:39 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
eslampop785
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:36:30 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
eslampop
EslamP248
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EslamP248,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2013 | 10:14:14 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
facebook
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2013 | 5:10:14 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
Revenge yes, justice only their own eyes, and reform only to remake the world to comform their ideas.
PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Ninja
3/14/2013 | 11:12:35 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
Great article but I have to agree with Leo, I dislike reading these articles for that reason alone. All though the topics are of interest, I donGÇÖt have the patience. I also have to disagree with Jonathan on his views on people and their awareness about their online security. I believe because of all the attacks and breeches and the general publicGÇÖs knowledge is constantly increasing, which was the exact opposite in the past.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 9:47:33 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
I hadn't heard of this Rustle League incident before. Hackers hacking hackers. I wonder if all of the news surrounding hacking and cybercrime lately could put a big enough dent in people's trust in the internet to actually change people's behavior. Will people start taking their individual online security more seriously? Personally, I doubt it. I feel like we have already developed a sort of blind trust in the internet because it makes our lives so convenient that we don't even want to consider what would happen if our online credentials were compromised.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2013 | 8:54:42 PM
re: Anonymous: 10 Things We've Learned In 2013
Information Week only had one important New Year's Resolution this year. '"No Slide Show Articles with out a prominent 'View-as-one-page' link." How's that working out for you so far?
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